Graphical Interaction Analysis Impact on Groups Collaborating through Blogs

By Fessakis, Georgios; Dimitracopoulou, Angelique et al. | Educational Technology & Society, January 2013 | Go to article overview

Graphical Interaction Analysis Impact on Groups Collaborating through Blogs


Fessakis, Georgios, Dimitracopoulou, Angelique, Palaiodimos, Aggelos, Educational Technology & Society


Introduction

Increasing interest has recently emerged on the utilization of social software (Allen, 2004) by the educational community. This occurs not only due to the increased availability of social applications on the internet (e.g., web 2.0 services) but also because of their consistency to modern learning theories. Indeed, the use of social software for educational purposes is directly related to the sociocultural theory (Vygotsky, 1986) and to the social constructivism theory (Ernest, 1994; Kim 2001). These theories advocate the importance of the learners' interaction during active participation to learning activities which provide opportunities for design and construction of meaningful artefacts. Blogs ("Blog," n.d.) constitute special instance of social software that is a network application supporting groups of actors in communication and interaction. In a general overview of educational uses of blogs, Downes (2004) notices that students participating in blogging have opportunities to (a) reflect on their texts; (b) engage in writing for significant time intervals; and (c) trigger long dialogue with their readers leading to new writing cycles. In teaching and learning, the blogs can be used (indicatively) to ("Blog," n.d.): collect learning resources and share ideas and experiences; log notes and observations during an inquiry learning activity; manage a project; develop dialogue like in an online forum; reflect and communicate with teachers and peers-students; develop collaboration and social skills; obtain the motivation of writing for readers who comment you in order to participate more actively in the course; run online school newspapers, etc.

In Chen et al. (2005) the researchers integrated blogging with the learning portfolio approach highlighting the importance of the adoption of a well-defined pedagogical approach for the successful integration of blogs or any other content management model (e.g., wikis). The study of the impact of the kind of work or the genre of learning activity (e.g. project, problem solving, brainstorming, etc.) to blogging used for educational purposes appears as interesting field of research. In this direction Fesakis et al. (2008) studied the combination of blogs to learning by design pedagogical approach (Han & Bhattacharya, 2001) and claimed that teachers can utilize blogs in order to increase the communication and interaction among the students as well as enhance their participation and active engagement in the classroom. The research evidence showed that blogs fulfill the requirements of the learning approach in an acceptable level. Moreover, students claimed that the blog support for the learning by design activity communication and information management was decisive. Through the use of blogging students had increased opportunities to receive feedback though comments of both fellow-students and teachers. The blog assisted teachers in monitoring the evolution/progress of students' interactions, intervene whenever needed and obtain diagnostic information during the implementation of the appropriate assignments. The quantitative summarization of participants' interaction using time bubble charts for posts and comments and Social Network Analysis (SNA) for comments shows that students have been reading and commenting each other intensively during the activity. This graphical analysis of the students' interactions during blogging is a third research dimension in Computer Supported Collaborative Learning using blogs. The work of Fessakis et al. (2008) aimed at understanding the relation of collaborative electronic learning environment (blog) and the genre of assigned work (learning by design).

Learning by design is related to constructionism, according to which new knowledge is more effectively developed by students when they are actively engaged in the construction of an external, shareable artefact that helps them to reflect and collaborate. Learning by design emphasises the learning value of the artefact design and at the same time underlines the learning benefits of the process regardless of the final product. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Graphical Interaction Analysis Impact on Groups Collaborating through Blogs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.