Vive la France! Our Parents Can Learn a Lot from the French Way, Says Author Pamela Family PARENTING TIPS: Right, Pamela Druckerman's New Book, French Parents Don't Give in, Which Looks at the Gallic Way of Child-Rearing Life MUMDAY Edited by Marie Turbill and Sarah Dale WWW.Gazettelive.Co.Uk/familylife

Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England), March 4, 2013 | Go to article overview

Vive la France! Our Parents Can Learn a Lot from the French Way, Says Author Pamela Family PARENTING TIPS: Right, Pamela Druckerman's New Book, French Parents Don't Give in, Which Looks at the Gallic Way of Child-Rearing Life MUMDAY Edited by Marie Turbill and Sarah Dale WWW.Gazettelive.Co.Uk/familylife


Byline: Edited by Marie Turbill and Sarah Dale

IF your kids' behaviour is driving you up the wall, it might be time to take a lesson from French parents. SARAH DALE reports.

LIKE children the world over, French youngsters can be badly behaved, sleep poorly, eat fussily and have tantrums.

But such behaviour is not the norm, insists author Pamela Druckerman.

After bringing up three young children in the country, she firmly believes that the more relaxed Gallic style of child-rearing achieves the results many British parents struggle for.

And she wants to share her knowledge of their methods with parents this side of the Channel.

Pamela, an American, moved to Paris after meeting her English husband, who works in France, and they now have three children - twin boys aged four, and a seven-year-old girl, all born in France.

She first wrote about her experiences of French parenting in the best-selling book French Children Don't Throw Food (Black Swan, PS7.99), which proved so popular that she's now condensed its advice into 100 key tips in the new guide French Parents Don't Give In (Doubleday, PS12).

She points out that British and American parents tend to "micromanage" their children, and seem to believe parents should dedicate themselves completely to the child, sometimes sacrificing both their wellbeing and relationship as a result.

"But the French believe you have to find a balance between what's good for the parents and what's good for the child," explains Pamela.

Highlighting this more laissez-faire parenting style, one of Pamela's tips is not to over-stimulate children, and another is that extra-curricular activities are for pleasure, not competitive advantage.

"The French idea is yes your children need stimulation, so read to them, show them things, play with them - but not all the time. The goal is balance," she explains.

She says it's usual for French parents to say their baby sleeps through the night at three or four months of age, never because they're left to cry, but because they use sleep teaching, a gradual process that follows the baby's cues. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Vive la France! Our Parents Can Learn a Lot from the French Way, Says Author Pamela Family PARENTING TIPS: Right, Pamela Druckerman's New Book, French Parents Don't Give in, Which Looks at the Gallic Way of Child-Rearing Life MUMDAY Edited by Marie Turbill and Sarah Dale WWW.Gazettelive.Co.Uk/familylife
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.