The Antiquation of America's Nuclear Weapons; Disarming While the World Gears Up a Dangerous Strategy

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 4, 2013 | Go to article overview

The Antiquation of America's Nuclear Weapons; Disarming While the World Gears Up a Dangerous Strategy


Byline: Robert R. Monroe, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

America is moving down a slippery slope, about to pass the point of no return. Our nuclear weapons capability is disintegrating. Here's a quick assessment.

President Obama's national goal - a world without nuclear weapons - is impossible and undesirable. Yet his administration is trying to lead the way into this fantasyland by making unilateral prohibitions, reductions, delays and cutbacks of all kinds. Today's nuclear weapons policies - established by the Obama team in the Nuclear Posture Review - lead to nuclear weakness, rather than the nuclear strength that has kept us safe for over half a century.

We have no coherent nuclear weapons strategy, and strategic deterrence no longer exists in our foreign policy. Our nonproliferation policies are so ill-conceived that we are about to trigger a global cascade of proliferation, leading to a world of nuclear horror and chaos. Our U.S. stockpile is composed of weapons well past the end of their design life and irrelevant to most of today's principal threats. Their condition ranges somewhere between deteriorated and unknown. Our two-decade nuclear freeze, our deplorable no-testing policy and our prohibition on design and production of new nuclear weapons have brought the technical expertise of our scientists, engineers and designers (and of our production and testing teams) into extreme circumstances. Key facilities in our nuclear research and production infrastructure are either seriously antiquated or non-existent, and their agreed-to modernization funding is being slashed.

While all this is happening here, nuclear weapons threats are increasing apace throughout the world. Every other nuclear weapons state is modernizing (and in many cases expanding) its nuclear arsenal. Russia has a robust development and production program for advanced nuclear weapons, and Kremlin strategy now calls for their early use in all conflicts. China, newly belligerent, is in the midst of an immense strategic modernization program, and the growing size of their improved, longer-range nuclear arsenal is cloaked in secrecy. Pakistan is rapidly increasing its nuclear stockpile, and India is responding with theirs. North Korea's tests of nuclear weapons and long-range missiles are in the news daily, as is Iran's absolute determination to achieve full nuclear weapons status. Mr. Obama, after four years' nuclear disarmament effort, hasn't a single nation-state follower.

Isn't there a disconnect here? Doesn't it seem reasonable to bring common sense and prudence to bear on America's security before we lose everything? …

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