United by Violence

By McKaiser, Eusebius | Newsweek, February 22, 2013 | Go to article overview

United by Violence


McKaiser, Eusebius, Newsweek


Byline: Eusebius McKaiser

The story of Pistorius reveals a dark truth about life in South Africa.

Since news broke on Valentine's Day of the arrest on murder charges of Paralympian star Oscar Pistorius, a fascinating pretrial saga is already playing out in South African courts.

Pistorius, we now know, will be arguing a defense of mistaken identity: that he killed his model girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp, thinking she was an intruder.

The state insists, however, that it can prove beyond reasonable doubt that it was premeditated murder. Time will tell which version of the story the courts accept. What is already clear, however, is that this is an incredible story of how South Africans' lives are united by violence even in the face of their unequal realities.

Pistorius is wealthy, earning millions of dollars annually in appearance fees, endorsements, and competition wins. Steenkamp, too, was a well-off South African model. And yet, despite the fact that Pistorius and Steenkamp symbolize the deep inequality that makes South Africa an economically unjust place for the poor black majority, this murder case links the couple with those who are poor, black, and anonymous on the other side of the wealth gap.

First, reports of domestic violence at Pistorius's home are not surprising. Violence has become normative here. Wealthy men, black and white, display the same problematic, patriarchal masculinities as men in the many shantytowns around the country. Wealth, and access to exceptional schools like Pretoria Boys High School, which Pistorius attended, do not guarantee that you will be the pacifist exception to a country's narrative about entrenched violence.

Second, in the event that Pistorius is found not guilty--and his defense lawyer had a good crack already at undermining the coherence of the state's case--this incident will remain one that tells us a lot about Pistorius and South Africa. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

United by Violence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.