Small Firm Marketing: Four Legal Trends You Can Work to Your Advantage

By Proxmire, Kim | Strategies: The Journal of Legal Marketing, September 2012 | Go to article overview

Small Firm Marketing: Four Legal Trends You Can Work to Your Advantage


Proxmire, Kim, Strategies: The Journal of Legal Marketing


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Today's is a tough economy--no doubt about it. This has meant that value for money, even for some of the biggest companies, is now a key consideration in choosing which law firm to represent a business's interests. It is no longer the case that corporate clients automatically rely solely on large, brand-name firms for all their legal needs.

For smaller firms, the economic downturn has actually created opportunities Lower costs, specialist expertise, a lack of potential conflict and a more personal touch are making small firms more attractive to many clients Add to that the growing trends of manufacturing reshoring, big firm flight and unbundling, and there are now a host of opportunities for small firms to take some market share from the big guys. As New York State Bar Association President Stephen Younger recently told Crain's: "With some of the big firms, it's harder to be creative in billing with clients... And with today's technology, you don't have to be in a big firm environment to have the manpower to drive a big case. A smaller boutique can compete." (1)

But no one will find these firms if they aren't successfully marketing themselves. So how do you ensure your firm is ready to grasp the brass ring, particularly when your own budget is a factor?

Start with Your Brand: What Defines You?

A small budget does not have to mean small reach A creative brand driven by the firm's business goals and an eye-catching and organized website, combined with an integrated approach online and offline, can make your firm stand out, even in the shadow of the mega firms with gargantuan marketing budgets. Greenfield Belser's research has demonstrated that buyers of legal services are shopping for demonstrated expertise, and it doesn't require a large budget to prove that. Specifically, the things they look for are expertise (do you have deep knowledge of particular industries?); cost/best value; reputation; and innovative approaches to problem solving

But your brand--your unique identity and promise of value --must convey your expertise. Visitors to your website will form an impression within half a second, according to our research. So ask yourself, what does your firm do, and then what does it do best? For example, do you specialize in certain industries? Do you have specific regional/local knowledge? Our research also shows that when people look for services, it is predominantly an intellectual exercise. But when people finally choose a service, it is predominantly an emotional exercise Your brand strategy needs to tell clients about your offerings in a way that is memorable and sustainable, yet appeals to the emotional side of the buying decision. And don't forget, the most powerful campaigns interweave both online and offline marketing strategies.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Unbundled Litigation: Make Your Firm the Obvious Choice

One area in which small firms stand to gain significant business is the growing practice of "unbundling" litigation Unbundling essentially means breaking up a case and then using different firms to handle its various aspects. As one observer puts it: "Rather than relying on one firm and paying for a package of legal needs, clients are turning to different firms, and in some cases to legal support businesses, for different tasks." (2) This gives smaller, leaner firms a distinct advantage as a specialized and economical alternative. Without the luxury of a big team to rely on, smaller firms tend to employ cost-effective technologies and expert knowledge to get the job done more efficiently.

Unbundling presents a great opportunity to position your firm as a specialist. What special services/knowledge can your firm offer? What do you want to be known for? Use this to inform your search strategy for search engine optimization (SEO) Take advantage of your blog to write posts to show off your expertise and incorporate keywords into your content. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Small Firm Marketing: Four Legal Trends You Can Work to Your Advantage
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.