Chris Huhne in Jail - a Tragedy? No, This Is First-Class Comedy!

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), March 13, 2013 | Go to article overview

Chris Huhne in Jail - a Tragedy? No, This Is First-Class Comedy!


Byline: Paddy SHENNAN Likes: Pubs, Everton and Half Man Half Biscuit. Hates: Everything else

IS IT unbecoming and distasteful to find pleasure and sweet satisfaction in the misfortune of others? It can be.

But is it totally right to punch the air in jubilation when a lying, scheming, hypocritical toe rag of a politician is brought to book? Of course it is.

Former cabinet minister Chris "I lied and lied again" Huhne has, along with his ex-wife Vicky Pryce, been sent to choky for eight months for perverting the course of justice over a speeding points swap scandal.

I realise there are sentencing guidelines in place, but what about making an example of people in high places who really should know better - and who, in their pampered public lives, seek to lay down the rules for the rest of us to live by? The cad, bounder and scoundrel should have been given double his sentence.

At the very least.

Judge Mr Justice Sweeney told him that "any element of tragedy is entirely your own fault".

Tragedy? Yes, I can see that... but only if I'm looking at it from the disgraced fool's point of view.

But for many of us, this has much more to do with comedy gold.

The judge also told one of the world's most inept criminals: "You have fallen from a great height. …

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