Horlicks for Chummy: Britain's Romance with Cosy TV Nostalgia

By Herman, David | New Statesman (1996), February 22, 2013 | Go to article overview

Horlicks for Chummy: Britain's Romance with Cosy TV Nostalgia


Herman, David, New Statesman (1996)


British television is on a huge nostalgia binge. On one Sunday evening in January, the new series of Call the Midwife (set in the East End of London in the 1950s) was sandwiched between Blandings (a 1920s country-house comedy) and Ripper Street (a late-19th-century cop show). On the same evening, BBC2 was repeating the Second World War episode of Fawlty Towers ("Don't mention the war") and ITV was running Mr Selfridge (an Edwardian drama described as "Downton Abbey with tills").

The following Tuesday, ITV offered the first part of Great Houses with Julian Fellowes. That's not counting all the reruns of 1970s comedies. On BBC2 on Christmas Eve, apart from Carols from King's, the entire evening schedule from 5.35pm to after midnight consisted of such repeats. Four of these made the top five for the channel's ratings during Christmas week.

Much of today's television drama, in particular, is set in the past, not least the two biggest hits of all, Call the Midwife and Downton Abbey. What is striking is not just that these are set in the past but how idealised their view of British history is. Why this turn to the past and why such cosy nostalgia?

There is a striking contrast with foreign TV drama. The best examples from the US (Homeland, Breaking Bad, Boss) are dark explorations of modern America. Similarly, Scandinavian series such as Wallander, The Bridge and The Killing have used detectives to transform our sense of modern Sweden and Denmark. While these series make gripping drama out of Muslim terrorists, Mexican drug cartels and modern-day politics, British TV is making Horlicks for Chummy.

The big TV event of 2013 is the new series of Call the Midwife. The Radio Times dedicated 13 pages to its return. Series one was acclaimed by critics and proved hugely popular with audiences. A second series was immediately commissioned after the drama's opening episode attracted nearly ten million viewers. The figures for the next two episodes passed ten million and episode four's rating of 10.89 million overtook ITV's 2010 hit Downton Abbey as the largest first-series audience for original drama on UK television in recent years. Both Downton and Call the Midwife are period dramas; both are hugely popular. There are two principal reasons for their appeal. First, they are soaps. Second, they present a rose-tinted vision of the past.

Call the Midwife is based on four books of memoirs by the late Jennifer Worth, about her experiences as a midwife in the East End. The differences between the books and the TV series are revealing. Worth's books are full of fascinating social history: about living conditions in east London, the scale of poverty and violence, the realities of postwar medicine and the workhouse. In her introduction, Worth points out what a "rough area" the East End of the 1950s was. "Pub fights and brawls were an everyday event," and; "Domestic violence was expected." Hardly any of this features in the TV series. The terrible daily grind of life without running water, central heating and washing machines that looms large in Worth's memoirs gives way to dewy-eyed romance.

Romance hardly features in the books. Jimmy, Jenny Lee's on-off "friend" in the TV series, barely appears in the books and there's no mention of his romance with Jenny. Chummy's romance with PC Noakes only features in one chapter in the four books and Chummy herself barely appears. Even Cynthia's moment with the widowed husband of a violinist who dies of eclampsia never happens. Indeed, Cynthia and Trixie, the minxy blonde, don't appear that much in the books. The opposite is the case with the TV series. It cleverly mixes romance with stories from Worth's books.

Conversely, the darkest stories in the book ("Molly", a story of domestic abuse; "Of Mixed Descent II", about a white husband's violent reaction to his wife having a black baby) never made it into the first series, though a predictably happier version of "Molly" began series two. …

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