"Rural North China, 1947-1948": Taikang Space

By Baecker, Angie | Artforum International, March 2013 | Go to article overview

"Rural North China, 1947-1948": Taikang Space


Baecker, Angie, Artforum International


In today's People's Republic of China, little is explicitly Communist, save perhaps the Chinese Communist Party itself. The country's socialist period is rife with thorny, unprobed complexities, a legacy so fraught and out of step with that of today's economic ascendancy that it is often completely sidestepped in discussions of China's contemporary economy and culture. Yet even if its influence may not always be evident, the Communist legacy continues to inform the very structure of Chinese society.

A recent exhibition of photographs from rural northern China in the period between the end of World War 11 and the founding of the PRC raised questions about this legacy indirectly, through the topic of rural land reform. It featured black-and-white images by David Crook, a British Communist who with his wife, Isabel, wrote important books on the new China, both of them in the process becoming lifelong residents of the country and witnesses to the better part of its twentieth century; and by Wu Qun and Gao Liang, early Communist military photographers who documented rural life, civil war, and early reorganizations of land rights in the preliberation period. Although rural land reform might seem tangential to the concerns of contemporary art, in fact it is the defining policy of the CCP as a Communist party, and the distinctions between rural and urban are a defining feature of Chinese society.

The exhibition was split into two galleries, one devoted to photographs taken by Crook, the other to those of Wu and Gao. All of them travelled through liberated areas of northern China, where the CCP was implementing early land reform, a process that would spread through nearly the entire country by 1953. Although the three photographers took the same geographic area and rural Chinese peasantry as their subject, they had different motivations for their work. Crook's images document the eight months he and his wife spent living in a Hebei Province village called the Ten Mile Inn. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

"Rural North China, 1947-1948": Taikang Space
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.