Motivation and Commitment: Pre-Service Teachers from Hong Kong and Mainland China at a Training Institute in Hong Kong

By Gu, Mingyue "Michelle"; Lai, Chun | Teacher Education Quarterly, Summer 2012 | Go to article overview

Motivation and Commitment: Pre-Service Teachers from Hong Kong and Mainland China at a Training Institute in Hong Kong


Gu, Mingyue "Michelle", Lai, Chun, Teacher Education Quarterly


Every year, mainland China sends numerous undergraduate and postgraduate students to study abroad at English-medium universities (Tan & Simpson, 2008), a large number of whom attend Hong Kong universities (Li & Bray, 2007), including the Hong Kong Institute of Education. The Institute is Hong Kong's principle local teacher education institution, with its graduates accounting for around 80% of kindergarten teachers, 84% of primary school teachers and 30% of secondary school teachers in Hong Kong. In the academic year of 2005-2006, 10% of the students admitted to the Institute's English Department were from mainland China; in the following two academic years, mainland students accounted for 18% and 62% of student intake, respectively.

Upon graduation, these mainland Chinese prospective student teachers would be eligible for employment in local secondary and primary schools. However, differences between the linguistic and cultural backgrounds of these cross-border prospective student teachers and their local counterparts may make it difficult for the former to become qualified teachers in Hong Kong. Whereas, Putonghua has long been the medium of instruction for all primary and secondary students in mainland China, Hong Kong's unique mix of Cantonese, Putonghua, and English makes for a more complex and diverse linguistic phenomenon (Li, 2009). Most mainland prospective student teachers have Putonghua as their first language and only a small number of them, those from Guangdong province, can speak Cantonese. Furthermore, the cross-border students have no experience of studying in such local schools, which may be considered to be at a disadvantage compared with their local peers.

Research indicates that historical and social backgrounds influence individuals' motivation to teach and their commitment to teaching (Gordon, 2000; Su, Hawkins, Huang & Zhao, 2001). This article reports on a comparative study exploring the motivation to teach and the commitment to teaching among non-local prospective student teachers from mainland China and their Hong Kong local counterparts.

Motivations to Teach, Commitment to Teaching, and Professional Identities

It is individuals' motivation to teach that draws them to become teachers, sustains their commitment to teach, and promotes their professional knowledge (Day, Elliot, & Kington 2005). Research across a variety of participant groups suggests that people entering pre-service teacher education share a number of common motivating factors, including a desire to work with or benefit students, a sense of altruism or a wish to make a difference in their community or society through teaching, the influence of parents, former teachers, peers or relatives, and the perceived benefits of a teaching job such as career security, vacations, and salary (Sinclair, 2008).

While research into motivation to teach has tended to focus on pre-service teachers' initial motives for becoming teachers, these can change in response to their educational experience and 'real' teaching experience during teaching practica (Sinclair, 2008). Previous studies on commitment to teaching have mainly focused on qualified teachers. Existent studies have identified various factors that affect in-service teachers' commitment to teaching, such as their teaching achievements, ethnic backgrounds, and gender (Hart & Murphy, 1990; Sinclair, 2008). Research has also suggested a relationship between teachers' entry motivations and their continued commitment to teaching: those who enter teaching because of strong altruistic motives are more likely to be frustrated by a lack of evaluation of their work and guidance with respect to goals, and are thus more likely to leave teaching (Mieth & Elder, 1996). In addition, intrinsically motivated teachers have been found to be more committed to teaching than extrinsically motivated teachers (Martinez-Pons, 1990). An examination of the internal factors that drive pre-service teachers to enter and remain in the teaching profession, as well as situated and social impacts, is important for both pre-service and in-service retention (Sinclair, Dowson, & McInerney, 2006). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Motivation and Commitment: Pre-Service Teachers from Hong Kong and Mainland China at a Training Institute in Hong Kong
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.