A Family's Tragedy-Leaked Pictures of a Teen's Fatal Accident

By Ghazzawi, Issam A. | Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies, July 2012 | Go to article overview

A Family's Tragedy-Leaked Pictures of a Teen's Fatal Accident


Ghazzawi, Issam A., Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies


CASE DESCRIPTION

Moral standards of behavior vary between individuals. They are reflection of norms, beliefs, values, and personal preferences. Individuals in organizations cannot rely only on their moral standards or intuition when deciding what is right or wrong, fair or unfair, and appropriate or inappropriate. They need to follow policies, standard operating procedures, and need to understand that not adhering to such procedures may lead to costly mistakes.

The core pedagogical objective of the case is to help provide an applied, hands-on format for students to increase their understanding of what responsibilities organizations and their professionals have towards the general public (i.e. customers/citizens); to further engage students in the topics of: Professional ethics, privacy rights, and privacy issues; and the right of the public to know.

CASE SYNOPSIS

This case is about a much--publicized story of an eighteen year old girl that lost her life instantly after losing control of her father's Porsche car on a toll road in Orange County's Lake Forest, (Southern California) on October 31, 2006. In this case, the California Highway Patrol "CHP" has acknowledged that against its policies and procedure, one of its dispatchers leaked the graphic pictures of the teen's nearly decapitated body onto the internet. The leaked images made their way to about 1,600 websites world-wide and were sent by strangers to her family and relatives by means of e-mails and text messages. The CHP apologized to the family and took disciplinary actions against two dispatchers who violated the agency's standard operating procedures.

In 2007, the girl's family filed a civil lawsuit against the California Highway Patrol agency and its dispatchers for the leaked images and cited violation of privacy, negligence and infliction of emotional distress. On the other hand, the CHP maintained a position that while the release of the photographs was morally wrong, the CHP and its dispatchers did not violate any governmental regulation or statute, and accordingly, the plaintiffs did not have a civil case against them. In 2008, the court dismissed the case and the family criticized the ruling and appealed it. After three years (December 28, 2010), the outcome of the law suit of this case was still undetermined.

This case serves as a great educational topic for discussing what responsibilities organizations and its professionals have towards the general public (i.e. customers/citizens);to further engage students in the topics of professional ethics, privacy rights and privacy issues, and the process of making ethical decisions.

INSTRUCTORS' NOTE

CASE ISSUES AND SUBJECTS

This case serves as a great educational topic for discussing what responsibilities organizations and its professionals have towards the general public (i.e. customers/citizens); to further engage students in the topics of professional ethics; privacy rights and privacy issues; and the right of the public to know.

INTENDED COURSES AND LEVELS

This case study explores the subject of ethical and responsibilities of professionals in the workplace. It is intended for class study application of concepts learned in the classroom. Instructors are encouraged to ask students not to search and look for the images. They are very graphic (unfortunately some sites still display these images).

This case is intended for advanced undergraduate or graduate courses in Organizational Behavior, and Business and Society. It is designed to compliment knowledge derived from concepts in organizational and individual ethical and legal responsibilities with their application to an actual setting. In other words, it seeks to provide an applied, hands-on format for students to increase their understanding of these topics. Answers to the questions in the case will derive from what students learned from theories and concepts. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Family's Tragedy-Leaked Pictures of a Teen's Fatal Accident
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.