Coast Guard Trying to Stay the Course on Its Shipbuilding Plans during Tough Fiscal Times

By Magnuson, Stew; Insinna, Valerie | National Defense, March 2013 | Go to article overview

Coast Guard Trying to Stay the Course on Its Shipbuilding Plans during Tough Fiscal Times


Magnuson, Stew, Insinna, Valerie, National Defense


The Coast Guard is in the middle of a 25-year effort to replace its fleets of aging ships, and has so far managed to obtain most of the funding it needs, said Mm. Robert J. Papp, commandant of the Coast Guard.

"Those years at sea taught me a lot of lessons. I don't control the weather, you adapt to the weather ... I don't make the rules in terms of budgetary process. I take the money that is eventually appropriated to me that comes from the scarce resources of the people of the United States, and we use it to best effect," Papp said in a speech at a Naval Surface Association conference.

One potential hiccup is funding for its final two National Security Cutters. The largest of the deep ocean-going vessels has funding and contracts are in place to build the fourth, fifth and sixth ships. The Hamilton, the fourth in the series, is expected to be christened this fall. Papp anticipated that a contract will be awarded for the sixth National Security Cutter about the same time.

There is no funding appropriated so far for the seventh and eighth ships.

Congress approved bills for fiscal year 2013 for long lead money for the final two ships, "so we're pretty pleased about that, and we'll just have to continue our negotiations on the '14 budget and the '15 budget. I hope we get construction for number seven and number eight in those two budgets and then keep moving forward," Papp said.

The second most vulnerable program is the Offshore Patrol Cutter, which is still in the early stages of development.

The Coast Guard is currently going through the numerous proposals it received.

The Offshore Patrol Cutter is currently the Coast Guard's highest priority program, Papp said. They will replace the service's already antiquated 210- and 270-foot medium endurance cutters. They are intended to fill the gap between the deepwater National Security Cutters and the smaller boats that patrol near shore.

"There seems to be significant interest out there to build 25 ships, and we're very pleased about that. I think people are thinking out of the box. They're looking at new designs. We need to think out of the box as well as we go forward, because ... this ship is going to be very, very important to us."

If the ship's development is slowed down because of budget cuts, it could create serious capability gaps, Papp has said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Coast Guard Trying to Stay the Course on Its Shipbuilding Plans during Tough Fiscal Times
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.