The Coming Reset on Cuba

By Nathan, James A. | USA TODAY, March 2013 | Go to article overview

The Coming Reset on Cuba


Nathan, James A., USA TODAY


MY FIRST TRIP TO CUBA ended recently I thought I would offer a few untutored observations. The meeting I attended was a bi-national, U.S.-Cuban conference on "the way forward." It was at a very high level, with some of the top specialists from both countries--and then there was me: no expert at all in these matters. My paper was on ethnic lobbies. To make a long academic paper short, I found that national policy gives little weight to ethnic groups over time.

After the American War for Independence, Federalists feared there were French and Irish revolutionaries in our midst. The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798 enabled the roundup and deportation of spies. Nobody was deported, but several hundred resident French and Irish Americans were arrested, and the shameful law remains on the books.

After the Civil War, armed Irish Americans crossed into Canada trying to provoke an Anglo-American war. Though many died on both sides of the frontier, U.S. policy never changed.

Following World War I, Anglophiles lobbied for the League of Nations. Others pushed for its rejection. In the end, no lobby made even a dent on the U.S.'s patrician elders in the Senate, who, all along, were bent on keeping faith with George Washington's famous admonition to "avoid entangling alliances."

In the run-up to World War II, new trality was supported widely by many ethnic groups. There were some ethnic interventionist importunings, but most agreed with those Norwegian Americans who, even after Nazis occupied Oslo, wanted to stay out of war by a margin of more than 10-to-one.

Concerns regarding ethnic American disloyalty were common in the last 100 years or so. There was the shameful roundup of Japanese Americans but, in fact, there never has been a Japanese American spy. Moreover, no German American ever was arrested for spying after 1939.

In the Cold War, hysteria about spies among us was too common, and spies aplenty were arrested. In my research, though, not a single native-born "ethnic" American spy ever was named, no less arrested. Soviet, Chinese, and Cuban spies were "sent" agents, or "residents," or, more often, sympathizers with majority ethnic backgrounds.

Suspicions of ethnic disloyalty were common about Muslims before 9/11, but Arab Americans account for less than 25% of the 400 terror cases the last 10 years.

In contrast, the Southern Poverty Law Center identifies thousands of separate American "nativist," "patriot" and "racial supremacist" terror groups with more than 300,000 dues-paying members. In the last decade, 30,000 of their fellow Americans were targeted--specifically, the president, Cabinet officers, military, non-Christians, and just ordinary citizens. American terror groups brag about hundreds of "successes" each year. Prosecutions are surprisingly few, and investigatory resources appear to be paltry.

In the spring, I went to Washington, D.C., to study one famous lobby, the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, the conservative pro-Israel group. AIPAC's fearsome reputation and effectiveness seem to be in eclipse. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Coming Reset on Cuba
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.