Anorexia Nervosa

Manila Bulletin, March 24, 2013 | Go to article overview

Anorexia Nervosa


"Famine is in thy cheeks." - William Shakespeare (1564-1616), English poet and playwright Romeo and Juliet, Act v. Sc.1 (1596)

I SUPPOSE that since there is a thriving multi-billion dollar weight loss industry, none of us are succeeding, except perhaps, anorexics. But victims of this eating disorder suffer a Cadmean victory over fat and left to themselves, die skin and bones.

Definition. According to the US National Institutes of Health, anorexia nervosa is an "eating disorder that involves limiting the amount of food a person eats... resulting in starvation and an inability to stay at the minimum body weight considered healthy" (for age and height). At some point, it becomes a psychiatric issue because the victim has an intense fear of weight gain even when in fact she/he is underweight.

Causes. A person with an anorexic mother or sister is highly susceptible, as well as individuals with low self-esteem or with perfectionism by nature - quite similar to bulimia (see last week). Now add to these OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder) and applying it to food, see how strict dieting is possible even if hunger pangs seem overwhelming. The neurotransmitter serotonin, the same brain chemical associated with depression, may play a role in anorexia nervosa.

Diagnostic Criteria. In the mental health professional's DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders), anorexia nervosa has four features: refusal to maintain a body weight at or above the minimum weight by age and height; pathologic fear of gaining weight even if underweight; having a distorted body image; in women with periods, absence of at least three menstrual cycles. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Anorexia Nervosa
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.