Norman Mailer Bibliography: 2011

By Zinck, Shannon L. | The Mailer Review, Fall 2012 | Go to article overview

Norman Mailer Bibliography: 2011


Zinck, Shannon L., The Mailer Review


Addenda Through 2010

PRIMARY

Mailer, Norman. Miami and the Siege of Chicago. 1968. New York: New York Review of Books, 2008. Print. New York Review Books Classics.

--. Abbie Hoffman, and Timothy Leary. Chicago Seven: Testimony From the 1968 Democratic Convention Conspiracy Trial. St. Petersburg: Red and Black Publishers, 2009. Kindle.

--, Alex Haley, Joyce Carol Oates and Peter Richmond. Muhammad Ali: Ringside. Old Saybrook, CT: Konecky & Konecky, 2009. Print.

SECONDARY

Essays, Articles, Book Chapters, Dissertations, and Creative Works

Brier, Evan. "1959 and Beyond: Mergers, Acquisitions, and Norman Mailer" A Novel Marketplace: Mass Culture, the Book Trade, and Postwar American Fiction. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 2010.127-155. Print.

Glenday, Michael K. "Norman Mailer." A Companion to Twentieth-Century United States Fiction. Ed. David Seed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. 377-85. Print.

Herbert, Shannon. "Playing the Historical Record: DeLillo's Libra and the Kennedy Archive." Twentieth Century Literature 56.3 (2010): 287-317. Print. This text examines DeLillo's Libra and its focus on the process and ritual of preserving the historical record, particularly as seen through the events of the Kennedy presidency and assassination, and in comparison to Norman Mailer's own transmission and interpretation of that historical record.

Kaplan, Fred. "The Philosopher of Hip." 1959: The Year Everything Changed. Hoboken: Wiley & Sons, 2010.15-25. Print.

Kuhn, David Paul. "Millett Versus Mailer: Vietnam, Feminism, and White Manhood as Vice." The Neglected Voter: White Men and the Democratic Dilemma. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.109-115. Print.

Matterson, Scott. "'Don't You Think It's About Time?': Back to the Future in Black and White" The Worlds of Back to the Future: Critical Essays on the Films. Ed. Sorcha Ni Fhlainn. Jefferson: McFarland, 2010. 62-72. Print. This text examines the significance of the year 1955 as the destination of Marty's first time travel trip. The year of Allen Ginsberg's "Howl" and Norman Mailer's co-founding of The Village Voice embodies a time of literary and historical change that forms the background of the film.

Olster, Stacey. "The Transition to Post-Modernism: Norman Mailer and a New Frontier in Fiction." Reminiscence and Re-Creation in Contemporary American Fiction. 1989. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2009. 36-71. Print.

Wilson, Andrew. "American Minimalism: The Western Vernacular in Norman Mailer's The Executioners Song." European Journal of American Studies 4.1 (2009): n. pag. Web.

2011

PRIMARY

Mailer, Norman. "'The Armies of the Dead,' from The Armies ofthe Night." Literary Capital: A Washington Reader. Ed. Christopher Sten. Athens: U of Georgia P, 2011. 391-95. Print.

--. The Fight. 1975. New York: Penguin Classics, 2011. Print.

--. "The Fight." At the Fights: American Writers on Boxing. Ed. George Kimball and John Schulian. New York: Library of America, 2011. Print. This chapter is an excerpt from Norman Mailer's The Fight.

--. "From Norman to Norris." The Mailer Review 5.1 (2011): 9. Print. This text is a brief note from Norman Mailer to his wife, Norris Church Mailer, regarding her first novel Winchill Summer.

--. "Norman Mailer." Interview by Ramona Koval. Speaking Volumes: Conversations with Remarkable Writers. Victoria: Scribe Pub., 2011. 69-87. Print.

--. Norman Mailer/Bert Stern: Marilyn Monroe. Ed. J. Michael Lennon. New York: Taschen Books, 2011. Print. This text is an abridgement of Norman Mailer's 1973 biography Marilyn with photographs by Bert Stern.

--. "Please Do Not Understand Me Too Quickly--the Last Interview." Interview by Michael Lee. Winter Tales: Men Write about Aging. Ed. Duff Brenna and Thomas E. Kennedy. Copenhagen: Serving House Books. …

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