Hypersexuality


"I keep making up these sex rules for myself, and then I break them right away." - J.D. Salinger (b.1919) US novelist The Catcher in the Rye (1951)

When sex occupies your mind to an extent that work, relationships, and health suffer, something may be wrong. Hypersexuality or compulsive sexual behavior (also nymphomania, erotomania) interferes with everyday living much like addiction to drugs, alcohol, or gambling. It is a pathologic state. However, mental health professionals will be quick to tell you that it is not an "official" diagnosis and only a subtype of an "impulse control disorder."

Signs & Symptoms. MayoClinic.com emphasizes that the following are beyond the control of the individual: having multiple sexual partners or extramarital affairs, having sex with anonymous partners or prostitutes, avoiding emotional involvement in sexual relationships, engaging in excessive masturbation, frequently using pornographic material, engaging in masochistic or sadistic sex, exposing yourself in public (exhibitionism), and using commercial sexually explicit phone and Internet services.

Causes. Research into organic causes of hypersexuality goes further than Freudian explanations for deviant sex. In particular, these diseases damage areas of the brain governing sexual behavior: Multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, dementia, and Parkinson's disease being treated with dopamine agonist medications. There can also be abnormalities in natural brain chemicals serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. Levels of androgens - the predominantly male hormones (but also present in women) - may be deranged thus affecting sexual desire. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hypersexuality
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.