A Postscript to Food Safety

Manila Bulletin, November 20, 2012 | Go to article overview

A Postscript to Food Safety


Two incidents, which happened while my series on Senate Bill No. 3311, the proposed Food Safety Act, was coming on this paper, prompted me to write this addendum.

The first was the ban on six brands of noodles imported from Korea. These are Nongshim Neoguri (Hot), Nongshim Neoguri (Mild Hot), Nongshim Neoguri (Multi Hot),Nongshim Big Bowl Noodle, Shrimp, Nongshim Saengsaeng Udon Bowl Noodle, and Nongship Saengsaeng Udon.

The Department of Health, through the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), imposed the ban on November 12 after learning that the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) had earlier asked the Nong Shim Co., Ltd., which manufactures all six noodle brands, to recall its products for safety reasons.

The ban was lifted several days later upon the request of the Korean Embassy, which gave assurances on the safety of Korean noodle products being sold in the Philippines, and after tests conducted by the FDA.

The FDA imposed the ban after being alerted by the EcoWaste Coalition, a non-government organization, that the six Korean noodle brands contained benzopyrene, which could cause cancer. The FDA said its tests showed that the banned noodles contained less than 5 ppb (parts per billion) of benzopyrene, far below the regulatory limit of 10 ppb.

However, the KFDA, which also conducted a thorough test on the Nong Shim products, issued a certificate last November 7 that the level of benzopyrene found in the noodles, which ranged from 0.4 to 1.6 ppb, was extremely low and has no harmful effect on the human body.

The second incident involved the health risks from some mugs being sold in Metro Manila and have become popular as Christmas gifts because they are cheap, costing P20 to P85 each. The EcoWaste Coalition found that out of the 35 sample mugs it examined, 29 contained an average of 12,643 parts per million of lead, way above the US limit of 90 ppm of lead in paint.

These two incidents confirmed the urgency of passing Senate Bill No. 3311 at the soonest possible time. And these underscored the importance of coordination and cooperation between the government and the public, as well as between government agencies.

SB 3311 will institutionalize such coordination and cooperation among government agencies because it provides the specific mandates of concerned agencies, as follows: The Department of Agriculture for the primary production and post-harvest stages of the food supply chain; the Department of Health for the safety of processed and pre-packaged foods; the local government units for food safety in the food businesses such as slaughterhouses, dressing plants, fish ports, wet markets, restaurants, and water-refilling stations; the Department of Interior and Local Government, in coordination with the agriculture and health departments and other agencies, for the enforcement of food safety and sanitary rules and regulations, as well as the inspection and compliance of business establishments and facilities within its territorial jurisdiction; and the agriculture and health departments, in coordination with the local government units, for the monitoring of the presence of biological, chemical, and contaminants in food products. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Postscript to Food Safety
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.