PHL's 1st Mindanao Muslim Femalemining Engineers Feted

Manila Bulletin, September 29, 2012 | Go to article overview

PHL's 1st Mindanao Muslim Femalemining Engineers Feted


DAVAO CITY-On October 5, two young women will be taking their oath before the Philippine Regulation Commission to become the country's first Mindanao Muslim women licensed mining engineers.

Musarapa Insiang and Haiza Pigkaulan were both on their way home in Mindanao when the news broke that they were among the 57 Engineering graduates who had passed the board examination. Haiza ranked third among the top 10 examinees.

"My mother, who is working in the Middle East, heard about the results before I could tell her," said Haiza, the eldest among six children. "Her co-workers and friends congratulated her, everyone was so excited."

"We are not a demonstrative people, but my father hugged me tight when we found out the news while waiting for our ride to our home town. He was so proud," recalls Musarapa.

Along with 11 other students from conflict-affected areas of Mindanao, the two women were able to complete their college degrees in Mining Engineering with assistance from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), through its Growth with Equity in Mindanao (GEM) Program under the oversight of the Mindanao Development Authority (MinDA).

All 13 mining engineering scholars supported by USAID passed the board examination.

KNOWING MINING

Mining is a relatively unknown academic field in the Philippines, and the few colleges that offer the subject only produce about three dozen licensed mining engineers annually, while the rapidly expanding industry requires at least a hundred per year.

The two women met as students at the University of Southern Mindanao in Kabacan, North Cotabato. "There were only a handful of Maguindanaoan women students, so naturally we bonded," said Haiza. When the area experienced heavy flooding, Musarapa took her in to share her room.

They decided to apply together for mining engineering scholarships offered by USAID through the GEM Program's Workforce Preparation component, and were accepted.

"When I was in elementary school, we heard mostly negative things about mining," said Haiza. "But in high school I saw for myself how mining companies can implement mitigating measures and rehabilitate mining areas, while providing development programs that help remote communities."

"Mining does take an environmental toll, but there are ways of replenishing what has been taken away," Musarapa said.

At Palawan State University, they encouraged each other to persevere in their mining engineering studies, particularly when they realized that they would be blazing trails as Mindanao Muslim women in a field traditionally dominated by men.

The pressure grew particularly intense as they reviewed for the board exam. "We both lost weight during the review, which coincided with Ramadan," Haiza recalls. "I told Musarapa, we have to pass, grabe yung expectations [there are a lot of expectations] from our communities and from those who are supporting us. …

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