'Heartbeat,' 'Personhood' Bills Reveal Pro-Life Split; Activists Attack Abortion at State Level

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 2, 2013 | Go to article overview

'Heartbeat,' 'Personhood' Bills Reveal Pro-Life Split; Activists Attack Abortion at State Level


Byline: Cheryl Wetzstein , THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Forty years after Roe v. Wade, a growing number of abortion foes say they are tired of waiting.

Exposing a rift in the pro-life camp, Republican-dominated state governments in Arkansas and North Dakota have pressed forward with legislation imposing the nation's toughest restrictions on abortion, all but inviting a courtroom confrontation taking on the 1973 Supreme Court decision.

North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple, a Republican, signed into law his state's heartbeat bill greatly restricting abortions when a fetal heartbeat is detected. He said lawmakers had the right to discover the boundaries of Roe v. Wade and immediately asked the legislature to set aside money for the inevitable legal battle.

After four decades of Roe and 55 million abortions, the strategy of incrementalism - chipping away slowly but steadily at abortion rights - has become anathema to some pro-lifers. But far-reaching personhood and heartbeat laws in states also are opposed by such establishment pro-life groups as the National Right to Life Committee and Americans United for Life. They warn that moving before the legal and political ground are prepared would simply hand the Supreme Court another chance to uphold Roe.

North Dakota's heartbeat law is not going to prevent a single abortion from happening, it's not going to go into effect, and it's not going to go to the Supreme Court, lawyer and pro-life supporter Paul Linton told Forum News Service.

But Dan Becker, president of Georgia Right to Life, argued that the go-slow approach needed an overhaul.

Talk about a paradigm shift! North Dakota is completely shattering the prevailing wisdom in some pro-life circles that moderation and 'compromise' are the only path to victory, Mr. Becker wrote on his organization's website.

Officials at Americans United for Life praised North Dakota lawmakers for enacting the first law banning most abortions on the basis of gender or genetic abnormality of the fetus. A civil society does not discriminate against people - born or unborn - for their sex or for disability, said the organization's chairwoman, Charmaine Yoest. But the group said nothing last week about passage of the heartbeat measure.

In North Dakota, pro-life allies passed a trio of abortion measures. …

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