Planning and Implementation of a Student-Led Immunization Clinic

By Dang, Christina J.; Dudley, Janet E. et al. | American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, June 2012 | Go to article overview

Planning and Implementation of a Student-Led Immunization Clinic


Dang, Christina J., Dudley, Janet E., Truong, Hoai-An, Boyle, Cynthia J., Layson-Wolf, Cherokee, American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education


INTRODUCTION

US Healthy People is a comprehensive set of disease prevention and health promotion objectives for the nation to achieve over a decade. (1) One of its objectives is to increase the immunization rate to 90% for influenza and pneumococcal immunization coverage among adults 65 years of age or older and to 60% for high-risk adults 18-64 years of age, with similar goals for Healthy People 2020. (1) Vote & Vax, a national program established by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (2) in collaboration with Sickness Prevention Achieved through Regional Collaboration, provides immunizations near polling sites on election day. Since the expansion of Vote & Vax to multiple states in 2004, the program mainly targets influenza prevention in underserved communities. Of the 21,434 people who received influenza vaccinations through the project, 48% had not received an influenza vaccination in the preceding year or would not have otherwise been vaccinated, which qualified them as new recipients. (2)

In the 2004 national elections, approximately 125 million Americans voted, with 65% to 70% of those being greater than 50 years old. (3) The more than 180,000 polling sites across the nation offer countless opportunities to reach medically underserved populations. The provision of vaccinations on election day can be used to target underserved populations, including minorities and the elderly, thereby decreasing hospitalizations and lowering healthcare costs. The inaugural Maryland Vote & Vax program targeted Prince George's County because of its historically low vaccination rates of less than 13.5%. (4)

Pharmacists are authorized to immunize in all 50 states and play key roles in educating patients about vaccinations. (5) The American Public Health Association 2006 policy statement on "The Role of the Pharmacist in Public Health" recognizes the important role of the pharmacist in the public health arena. (6) As readily accessible health care providers, pharmacists have the opportunity to increase immunization rates. (5) Providing immunization services can increase public awareness of the expanding role of pharmacists as well as provide a valuable public health service to underserved communities.

This article describes a 13-step process accompanied by action items, explaining the planning and implementation process for a student and faculty pharmacist-led influenza clinic on election day to increase immunization rates and improve public health. Lessons learned and practical recommendations are also provided, as well as an evaluation of the process, impact, and outcomes of this public health program.

THE THIRTEEN-STEP PROCESS

A 13-step process was developed and implemented for the Vote & Vax influenza clinic on Election Day 2010 at a community center in Prince George's County, Maryland.

1. Conceptualize an Idea

The idea of implementing the Vote & Vax initiative in Maryland resulted from a discussion between a student pharmacist and her preceptor during a public health pharmacy practice experience at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. After reading about the Vote & Vax initiative, the student recruited a classmate with public health experience to discuss implementation of Vote & Vax and conduct a needs assessment with guidance from her preceptor.

2. Conduct a Needs Assessment

The first step in a public health program is to identify and assess a need in the community. The program's goal was to improve vaccination rates through implementation of an influenza clinic that would provide free vaccinations on election day. Vaccination and polling site statistics were compiled for Maryland's 23 counties and Baltimore City. Based on the Healthy People 2010 objective 22.24 (1) and local statistics, Baltimore City and Prince George's County were targeted because of their historically low vaccination rates. (4)

3. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Planning and Implementation of a Student-Led Immunization Clinic
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.