Building for Mission, Not Monument

By Swift, Diana | Anglican Journal, September 2012 | Go to article overview

Building for Mission, Not Monument


Swift, Diana, Anglican Journal


In the wake of a whirlwind consulting tour visiting cathedral-restoration experts in seven different countries, the Rt. Rev. Victoria Matthews, bishop of Christchurch, N.Z., is standing by her decision to take down the collapsing Christchurch Cathedral, despite formidable opposition.

"I was painted as the selfish bishop who wanted to build a whole new cathedral to leave as my legacy," says this Canadian who became bishop of Christchurch in August 2008. But the majority in the diocese and the country have supported my decision to put human life ahead of buildings, no matter how historic," says Matthews. In an interview, Matthews pointed out that 2.6 diocesan churches need rebuilding after the quakes, "so the last thing on my mind is building a new cathedral."

Matthews says she was deeply impacted as she watched from a crane while powerful machines delicately moved the huge blocks of stone during the search for human remains after the February 2011 quake. It was the realization that restoration workers' lives could be lost if they went into the unstable cathedral that lay behind her decision.

"Christchurch is involved in an ongoing seismic event, which means that at any time the earth may move and buildings can come down," she says. "The cathedral is literally rocking itself to death."

Her fear is that onsite workers could be killed or injured by another quake during the long process of rebuilding. "We said, 'That's not good enough, so we will bring it down,' but we are trying to salvage as many heritage pieces as we can," she says.

Until the construction of a new permanent cathedral, the Anglican presence in the heart of Christchurch will be represented by the nearby parish of St. …

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