The Rote Sets In: Michael Gove's Pub Quiz History Curriculum

By Evans, Richard J. | New Statesman (1996), March 15, 2013 | Go to article overview

The Rote Sets In: Michael Gove's Pub Quiz History Curriculum


Evans, Richard J., New Statesman (1996)


Michael Gove's new draft national curriculum for history, launched on 7 February, has been greeted with dismay by history teachers at every level, from primary schools to universities, and from every part of the political spectrum.

What has annoyed them most is Gove's decision to ignore the consultation process and do it all himself. He initially asked the historian Niall Ferguson to come up with ideas for a new curriculum but Ferguson's response, based on a positive presentation of Europe's--and especially Britain's--global ascendancy since the early modern period, did not appeal to Gove, because it advocated history with a global sweep instead of history focused on supposedly key personalities and events within the British past.

Sidelining Ferguson, Gove then asked another expatriate British television historian, Simon Schama, to take a lead. A process of consultation began. A large meeting was held with interested parties including the Better History Forum of conservative teachers led by a former teacher, Sean Lang. Clearly those selected to advise the secretary of state, such as Steven Mastin, a state school history teacher, were chosen partly for political reasons (Mastin was an unsuccessful Conservative candidate at the zoio general election). With their participation, a draft national history curriculum was hammered out in January and prepared for consultation.

What was actually announced in early February came as a shock to everyone. Those who had taken part in the preparation process did not recognise it. The history profession, including the history sections of the British Academy, the Historical Association, the Royal Historical Society and History UK, complained that the "details of the [new] curriculum have been drafted inside the Department for Education without any systematic consultation or public discussion with historians, teachers or the wider public".

Even conservative historians were dismayed. A group of 15 academic historians close to the Conservative Party gave their support in a letter to the Times only "in principle" and hoped that the proposals "will no doubt be adapted as a result of full consultation". Ferguson found the draft curriculum "too prescriptive" and complained that his advice to Gove on this point had been ignored. Lang complained on behalf of the Better History Forum: "Our proposal was ignored; Mr Gove has apparently shut his ears to anyone's advice but his own." Mastin said the proposed new curriculum bore "no resemblance" to drafts he had worked on as late as January of this year. "Between January and the publication of this document--which no one involved in the consultation had seen--someone has typed it up and I have no idea who that is," he remarked.

The answer is inescapable: it was Gove. Just as Margaret Thatcher declared herself shocked and appalled when she saw her first national history curriculum, drawn up largely by education professionals, Gove must have reacted with dismay when he saw the final draft of his history curriculum. Neither document delivered what the politicians wanted, namely the learning of names, dates and facts strung together to form a celebratory, pati-otic national narrative. Unlike Thatcher, however, who in the end reluctantly respected the professionals' expertise, he tore it up and wrote his own.

What does the proposed new curriculum suggest? It begins well enough by reminding us: "A high-quality history education equips pupils to think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments and develop perspective and judgement." Yet this introduction seems to have been left over from an earlier draft, for it is no more than a token gesture, almost completely forgotten in the rest of the text, which focuses on listing the facts that pupils will have to learn by rote.

The contradiction between aims and content is even more crass in the passage about the requirement that pupils "know and understand the broad outlines of European and world history". …

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