Successful Texas Public Health Effort Takes to the Skies to Combat Rabies

By Krisberg, Kim | The Nation's Health, April 2013 | Go to article overview

Successful Texas Public Health Effort Takes to the Skies to Combat Rabies


Krisberg, Kim, The Nation's Health


IN JANUARY, about 1 million tiny packets the size of takeout ketchup packages fell from the Texas sky. The packets had been dipped in fish oil, rolled in fish crumbles and imprinted with a "do not disturb" warning. Harmless to people, the tiny packets are the perfect bait for wild canines.

Since 1995, public health authorities in the Lone Star state have been flying over wild areas of southern and western Texas, dropping millions of such cleverly camouflaged baits filled with rabies vaccine. And their efforts have been a success: Canine rabies cases in southern Texas fell from 122 in 1994 to zero in 2000, with single cases in 2001 and 2004 each within a mile of the Rio Grande. Cases of fox rabies, once prevalent in west Texas, dropped from 244 cases in 1995 to zero in 2010. Rabies in humans is fatal if not treated before symptoms arise.

A few years before the aerial drops began, wild rabies seemed to be making a comeback in Texas, with rabies outbreaks moving northward from the border by about 50 miles a year, said veterinarian Ernest Oertli, PhD, DVM, director of the Oral Rabies Vaccination Program at the Texas Department of State Health Services. By 1994, wild rabies had made its way up to the outskirts of San Antonio, Austin, Waco, Dallas and Fort Worth. Regular management strategies focused on vaccinating domestic pets to act as a buffer between wild rabies and humans, Oertli said. Still, that was not enough--Texas health officials needed a way to eliminate rabies in the wild. They found the solution in Canada, where officials were using aerial rabies bait drops to curb the disease among red foxes, Oertli said. Soon after, Texas became the first U.S. state to adopt the aerial strategy.

"We thought we'd be able to at least control rabies (in coyotes and foxes), if not eliminate it completely," Oertli told The Nation's Health.

State health officials, working with Texas Wildlife Services and Texas Military Forces, first targeted coyotes and then went after gray foxes. During the first aerial drop, officials put down about 350,000 rabies vaccine baits, Oertli said. Nearly two decades later, the Oral Rabies Vaccination Program has dropped a total of more than 36 million rabies vaccine baits over a total 501,200 square miles. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Successful Texas Public Health Effort Takes to the Skies to Combat Rabies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.