Do Mums Worry More about Sons Than Daughters? Three Mothers Tell Why Their Girls Are Less Likely Than Boys to Give Them Sleepless Nights Growing Up

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), April 19, 2013 | Go to article overview

Do Mums Worry More about Sons Than Daughters? Three Mothers Tell Why Their Girls Are Less Likely Than Boys to Give Them Sleepless Nights Growing Up


Byline: Joan McFadden

DO women worry about their sons more than their daughters? Mothers often describe a special bond with their sons, which is notably different from how they feel about their daughters and it's not based solely on love.

Despite the belief that men are stronger and tougher than women, many mothers confess that worrying about sons simply never ends.

Is it a fear about the future? Or is it a case that mummies' boys really do exist? Gillian MacGregor, 35, and her husband Peter, 30, live in Bishopbriggs, near Glasgow, with their daughter Neve, four, and two year-old son Luca.

Yoga teacher Gillian admits being the mother of a young boy was not as straightforward as her experience with her daughter.

She said: "From the moment Luca was born, the whole experience was different. He fed constantly through the night and started crying a few weeks later with colic and reflux."

Neve had been such an easy baby that Gillian was taken aback and started worrying.

She said: "Neve is going to school in August and is ready for it, able to ask questions and quite confident around adults.

"Luca's starting nursery in August, but I worry about him settling.

"He's not so confident."

Gillian also feels concerned about his ability to stand up for himself, especially when she sees just how physical boys can be.

She said: "I worry about him coping with life in a way I never do with Neve and I can see that continuing for years."

Lisa Armstrong, 40, from Milngavie, believes that worrying about her children is part of a mother's DNA, but is concerned about her son Mack, seven, and her nine year-old daughter Ella for different reasons.

She said: "I think I have worries in some areas, which are gender based - I'm concerned for her growing up in a world where there's so much oversexualisation of women. …

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