An Electoral-Reform Tsunami; Pending Lawsuits Could Force a Cleanup of Voter Fraud

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 29, 2013 | Go to article overview

An Electoral-Reform Tsunami; Pending Lawsuits Could Force a Cleanup of Voter Fraud


Byline: Robert Knight, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Jefferson Davis County in southwest Mississippi has the distinction of being named after Confederate States of America President Jefferson Davis. ThatAAEs good or bad, depending on whether you regard what occurred between 1861 and 1865 as the Civil War or as the War Between the States.

Jefferson Davis County may soon have another distinction as the place where a serious national legal effort to push back against vote fraud was launched.

On Friday, three former U.S. Justice Department attorneys filed lawsuits in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi seeking an order to compel election officials in Jefferson Davis County, as well as in nearby Walthall County, to clean up their voter rolls.

Like hundreds of counties around the nation, these two have more active registered voters than there are age-eligible residents, a perfect recipe for making sure the dead or otherwise departed get a chance to vote again and again.

Citing 2010 U.S. census data and voter-registration records, the lawsuit states that Jefferson Davis County has 10,078 active voters, but only 9,536 age-eligible citizens. More than 105 percent of living citizens old enough to vote were registered to vote in Jefferson Davis County in 2013, the lawsuit says.

Walthall County has 14,108 registered voters, but only 11,368 age-eligible citizens, which means that 124 percent of WalthallAAEs eligible voters are registered. Not a good set of numbers if youAAEre concerned about vote fraud.

On behalf of the American Civil Rights Union and its supporters in Mississippi, the lawsuits filed by attorneys J. Christian Adams, Christopher Coates and Henry Ross also ask the court to order election officials to provide records and data for public inspection as required by Section 8 of the National Voter Registration Act, better known as the Motor Voter Law.

The lawsuits are part of the American Civil Rights UnionAAEs Election Integrity Defense Project, among whose architects are Edwin Meese III, a former U.S. attorney general under President Reagan, and J. Kenneth Blackwell, former Ohio secretary of state.

Mr. Adams and Mr. Coates resigned their posts in the Voting Section of the Justice Department in 2010. They testified to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission that the Obama administration was blatantly biased, as exemplified by dismissing voter-intimidation charges against New Black Panther Party members at a Philadelphia polling station in 2008. On April 16, Mr. Adams testified before the House Judiciary Committee as to how the Justice DepartmentAAEs Civil Rights Division under Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez has overlooked criminal behavior within its ranks while refusing to enforce Section 8. The Mississippi lawsuits are a way of doing the job that Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr.AAEs staff wonAAEt do.

Looking over the electoral landscape, itAAEs clear that a more robust effort to force officials to ensure electoral integrity is long overdue. Every fraudulent vote cancels out a legitimately cast ballot and undermines confidence in our electoral system. …

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An Electoral-Reform Tsunami; Pending Lawsuits Could Force a Cleanup of Voter Fraud
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