Foreign Law Bill Generates Controversy; Opponents Say It's Just a Veiled Attempt to Ban Sharia Law in Florida

By Hannan, Larry | The Florida Times Union, April 23, 2013 | Go to article overview

Foreign Law Bill Generates Controversy; Opponents Say It's Just a Veiled Attempt to Ban Sharia Law in Florida


Hannan, Larry, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Larry Hannan

A bill that passed the Florida House last week prohibiting foreign legal principles from being used in state courts appears to have united Muslim and Jewish advocates in opposition to it.

The legislation, which is often referred to as the anti-Sharia law even though the word "Sharia" appears nowhere in it, must still pass the Florida Senate and be signed into law by Gov. Rick Scott. The governor has said he supports it.

Supporters of the legislation argue that the bill is designed to ensure foreign law does not infiltrate the state's family courts. Opponents say it is a thinly veiled attempt to ban Sharia, or Islamic law, which is based on the Koran, but the way it's written could make it difficult to enforce contracts and family law agreements that were done outside the United States.

"It sends a message that Florida is not a state that welcomes Muslims and members of the Jewish community," said Hassan Shibly, executive director of the Tampa chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

The law could threaten marriages done in foreign countries and calls into question whether divorces and premarital agreements will be honored, Shibly said.

Dave Barkey, an attorney with the Anti-Defamation League, said the bill is obviously designed to prevent Islamic law from being used in courts. But it will also affect Jewish law.

"In Jewish communities, the Beth Din regulates family law," Barkey said. "Courts in Florida will no longer be able to honor that under this legislation."

Rep. Larry Metz, R-Yalaha, the bill's sponsor, told The Associated Press that the measure is limited to foreign law in state family court and only laws that contradict federal and state constitutional rights.

Metz said it does not target specific religions and would not invalidate a foreign marriage.

"With the increasing internationalization of the economy, it's more likely people coming here are going to have legal agreements and decrees from their native countries and they're going to want to have those enforced in Florida courts," Metz said.

Randy McDaniels, head of ACT! Jacksonville, a local chapter of a national group that describes itself as anti-radical Islam, said the law is needed.

"It prohibits parts of international law that conflict with our laws and constitution," McDaniels said.

He cited a 2010 case in New Jersey where a Moroccan woman sought a restraining order against her husband after he repeatedly assaulted and raped her. The judge denied the request, finding that the defendant lacked criminal intent because he believed that his wife must comply, under Islamic law, with his demand for sex. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Foreign Law Bill Generates Controversy; Opponents Say It's Just a Veiled Attempt to Ban Sharia Law in Florida
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.