DHS Struggles to Find Effective Measures for Border Security

By Tadjdeh, Yasmin | National Defense, May 2013 | Go to article overview

DHS Struggles to Find Effective Measures for Border Security


Tadjdeh, Yasmin, National Defense


* Attempts to create a better system to gauge the effectiveness of border security have not yet come to fruition, said a top Customs and Border Protection official.

Since 2010, the Department of Homeland Security has been working on its Border Condition Index (BCD. The index--which is meant to evaluate the state of border security--will examine data and trends, both quantitatively and qualitatively. The initiative is meant to look past how much money has been spent, or how many personnel DHS has hired as the sole indicators of a safer border.

"It's not appropriate to measure inputs standing alone as measures of border security," said Mark Borkowski, assistant commissioner at CBP's office of technology innovation and acquisition during a House subcommittee on border and maritime security hearing. "It's not correct to say we just spent a lot of money and therefore we're better. We need to link that to outcomes."

Still, Borkowski said that the BCI was never meant to be a complete gauge of border security, but rather a tool to use alongside other data.

"It is an indicator; it's not a perfect number," he said.

Chairman of the subcommittee, Rep. Candice Miller; R-Mich., said that if the BCI cannot be ready within the next two years, Congress will need to reevaluate whether it will be a useful tool. A way to formally evaluate border security is needed before comprehensive immigration reform can take place, she said.

"Without a way to quantify effectiveness there can really be no basis of determining how secure our borders are, let alone justification for immigration policy decisions," said Miller. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

DHS Struggles to Find Effective Measures for Border Security
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.