From Ancient Cairns to the Birth of the Bouncing Bomb; Dylan Iorwerth Joins One of Cadw's Regional Inspectors in the Hills of Radnorshire to Discover One of the Latest Historic Monuments to Be Scheduled in Wales and One of the Most

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), May 14, 2013 | Go to article overview

From Ancient Cairns to the Birth of the Bouncing Bomb; Dylan Iorwerth Joins One of Cadw's Regional Inspectors in the Hills of Radnorshire to Discover One of the Latest Historic Monuments to Be Scheduled in Wales and One of the Most


Agaping hole in its wall and massive boulders of smashed-up concrete are the features that make it so special. Looking down at the remains, Cadw's Regional Inspector of Archaeology and Ancient Monuments for Mid and North-East Wales Will Davies explains why.

Nant y Gro is famous for the Dambusters' Raid, immortalised in film. It was here, in May and July 1942, that Barnes Wallis carried out two experiments that would lead to the invention of his bouncing bomb.

Less than a year later, a squadron of Lancaster bombers attacked three dams in the industrial heartland of Germany's Ruhr, denting the German war effort and ensuring Nant y Gro's place on the schedule of monuments.

That means Nant y Gro is a monument of national importance protected by law from any actions that might adversely affect it.

Even work to conserve it will need Cadw approval. In contrast to listing, scheduling protects earthworks, ruins and buildings that are no longer occupied or in use; bridges are an exception.

Next, Will is looking for prehistoric cairns, standing stones and stone circles noted in a survey by Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust - the four Welsh trusts draw up lists of possible sites for Cadw's inspectors to visit, some for scheduling.

These are the two poles of Cadw's scheduling work - from prehistory to evidence of 20th-century conflicts.

In between are 4,000 castles, abbeys, deserted farmsteads and more unusual sites.

"Scheduling is our most powerful tool," says Kate Roberts, one of Cadw's two senior scheduling inspectors.

"It's about identifying archaeological sites that are of national importance and giving them protection."

Back on the open mountain, Will Davies is using his GPS device - the archaeologist's sat nav - to find out exactly where the prehistoric remains should be.

Even in driving, horizontal rain, the global positioning system is accurate within metres. He spots two poorly defined mounds in the heather and coarse grass, unmarked on his survey report.

Soon the red-and-white surveying rods are in place on two small heaps of stones, the tape measure is out and he is certain that we have found two more prehistoric cairns.

"It's often extremely difficult to be certain about these very early sites," he explains. "But context helps."

And he picks out the outline of other cairns and a fallen standing stone.

"These might not seem spectacular in themselves, but they are important as components of an extensive and undisturbed ritual landscape including a stone circle, enclosures and several other burial cairns and standing stones. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

From Ancient Cairns to the Birth of the Bouncing Bomb; Dylan Iorwerth Joins One of Cadw's Regional Inspectors in the Hills of Radnorshire to Discover One of the Latest Historic Monuments to Be Scheduled in Wales and One of the Most
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.