A Meta-Analysis of Environmentally Sustainable Supply Chain Management Practices and Firm Performance

By Golicic, Susan L.; Smith, Carlo D. | Journal of Supply Chain Management, April 2013 | Go to article overview

A Meta-Analysis of Environmentally Sustainable Supply Chain Management Practices and Firm Performance


Golicic, Susan L., Smith, Carlo D., Journal of Supply Chain Management


INTRODUCTION

Sustainability is playing an increasingly significant role in planning and management within organizations and across supply chains (Kleindorfer, Singhal & Van Wassenhove, 2005; Linton, Klassen & Jayaraman, 2007; Srivastava, 2007). In its broadest conceptualization, sustainability has been defined as meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs (UN Documents, 1987). (1) In management research, it has been incorporated within the context of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and commonly assessed through a range of social, cultural, legal, political, economic and natural environmental dimensions (Wood, 2010).

Research and practitioner interest in sustainability emerged in part due to concern for the potential impact that regulatory compliance and stakeholder pressure may have on planning and management decisions and resulting corporate financial performance (CFP) (Vachon & Klassen, 2009; Porter & van der Linde, 1995). Responses to such pressures have been posited as an impediment to performance on the one hand, while alternative propositions suggest that the adaptation may spur innovation, enhance operations and offer sources of competitive opportunity (Porter & van der Linde, 1995). In an effort to bring clarity to the CSR-CFP relationship, a plethora of studies have been conducted over the past four decades (Wood, 2010). Mixed positive, negative and nonsignificant outcomes, however, have only added to a debate concerned with theoretical support for the sustainability-performance relationship and the value of continued study (Griffin & Mahon, 1997; Orlitzky, Schmidt & Reynes, 2003; Wood, 2010; Wood & Jones, 1995).

Efforts to reconcile prior results have included narrative reviews as well as effect-based analyses as a means to aggregate and interpret the relationship between CSR and UP (Frooman, 1997; Orlitzky, 2001; Orlitzky & Benjamin, 2001; Orlitzky et at., 2003). Meta-analysis has been used to consolidate factors and assess a general CSR to CFP link. The same studies have attempted to gain further insights into the relationship by refining their analyses based on different types of corporate social performance, by considering how the constructs are operationalized and by distinguishing among research methods and the temporal sequence of the CSR--CFP relationship (Frooman, 1997; Margolis, Elfenbein & Walsh, 2009; Orlitzky et al., 2003). While the outcomes of these meta-studies have generally found a positive association between CSR and CFP, individual studies were also criticized as offering few theoretical explanations to support the proposed relationship (Wood 2010). Wood argued that the inconsistent results may be attributed to stakeholder mismatching, citing a lack of evidence in studies connecting those (stakeholders) who establish expectations relevant to the measure of CSR, those who experience the effects of corporate behaviors and those who are evaluating performance. In their review of research in CSR, Wood and Jones (1995) note CSR "... displays a serious mismatch of variables which are mixed and correlated almost indiscriminately with a set of stakeholder-related performance variables that are not theoretically linked" (p. 231).

While the landscape of research addressing the relationship between sustainability and firm performance has addressed multiple CSR dimensions, interest in the environmental dimension of sustainability has become more prominent in operations and supply chain management research as firms understand the impacts supply chains may have on the natural environment as well as society (Carter & Rogers, 2008; Srivastava, 2007; Vachon & Klassen, 2008; Wu & Page11, 2011). A number of recent articles document a growing body of research adopting a broader systems approach, thus connecting stakeholders, toward environmental supply chain management. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Meta-Analysis of Environmentally Sustainable Supply Chain Management Practices and Firm Performance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.