All That Survives of the Younger Purcell's Instrumental Music

By Sadie, Julie Anne | Gramophone, March 2013 | Go to article overview

All That Survives of the Younger Purcell's Instrumental Music


Sadie, Julie Anne, Gramophone


D Purcell

'The Unknown Purcell: Sonatas by Daniel Purcell' Chaconne in Aminor. Rondeau in Bflat. Solos--in A; in Bminor; in D. Sonatas--in A; in A; in Bminor; in D; in D; in Fminor. Suite in Dminor. Toccata in Aminor. Alass when charming Sylvia's gon. Lovely Charmer. What ungrateful devil moves you Hazel Brooks vn David Pollock hpd Chandos Chaconne (F) CHAN0795 (76' * DDD)

Daniel Purcell--who was younger than Henry Purcell and outlived him by more than 20 years and who, according to Peter Holman, was more likely to have been his cousin than his brother was trained as a choirboy and organist but spent most of his career writing for the London stage (contributing music to some 40 productions) and for public concerts. Among his surviving works are his arrangements of theatre music for solo harpsichord, some of which found their way into popular published collections of the day, as well as his own edition of violin sonatas.

Although three of the six sonatas have been recorded before (Et'cetera, 1999), most of the music on this disc, dating from the late 1690s and early 1700s, will be new to listeners and represents all that survives of his instrumental music. Charming if not memorable, most of the pieces are short and make relatively modest demands on the performers, so were probably intended mainly for private music-making.

In the booklet biographies, Hazel Brooks and David Pollock express their intention to develop performances that highlight the versatility of the harpsichord as the sole continuo instrument. This, however, has inclined them to go their separate ways: Brooks, who is an accomplished and knowledgeable performer, contributes remarkably straight-toned readings with minimal rhetoric and ornamentation, while Pollock pursues amore expressive and stylish approach, both as Brooks's accompanist and as a soloist. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

All That Survives of the Younger Purcell's Instrumental Music
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.