The Bronze Age Mortuary Vessels of Ban Non Wat

By Barribeau, Tim | Asian Perspectives: the Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific, Spring-Fall 2011 | Go to article overview

The Bronze Age Mortuary Vessels of Ban Non Wat


Barribeau, Tim, Asian Perspectives: the Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific


INTRODUCTION

THIS ARTICLE ANALYZES THE BRONZE AGE MORTUARY CERAMICS from the site of Ban Non Wat, Thailand, in order better to understand how these vessels relate to chronology and the changes that occur in burials through the time. This investigation employs statistics to analyze the occurrences of particular ceramic forms, including seriation, near neighbor, and correspondence analyses. Furthermore, spatial analyses of both the layout of mortuary vessels and of burials were undertaken, as were numerical comparisons of these features to indicate if certain pot forms are tied to wealth.

Ban Non Wat in Changwat Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand, is a prehistoric site that was occupied from the Neolithic to the historic period. Beginning in 2002, it has been excavated as part of the "Origins of Angkor" research program, which has been investigating archaeological sites in the region for more than a decade. Ban Non Wat stands out in terms of the breadth of artifacts uncovered and the area of the site excavated. This article concentrates on the Bronze Age, a still highly contentious period due to the current debate surrounding chronology and social organization (Muhly 1988; O'Reilly 2000, 2003). The large scale of the excavation at Ban Non Wat has allowed us firmer insight with regard to Bronze Age chronology and social complexity.

Ban Non Wat is a "moated" prehistoric site, meaning it is ringed by a series of ditches and banks, creating a number of moats around the location. The moats were most likely used as a method of water control, but have been dated to the Iron Age (McGrath and Boyd 2001), and so are not dealt with in this article.

The site of Ban Non Wat is unique among Southeast Asian excavations in the amount of data recovered. Excavated for over 20 months, Ban Non Wat has provided a breadth of information, which offers the opportunity to gain further insight into the prehistory of the Mun River valley. This excavation has unearthed one of the largest mortuary samples in Southeast Asia, with over 600 burials recorded. For this study, only Bronze Age burials that included ceramics, and were clearly photographed, could be analyzed. This created a sample of 87 burials, over 4000 artifacts, and more than 750 vessels.

Bronze Age burials were interred in rows, with individuals often being buried with ceramics of a distinctive tradition. The combination of a large sample of complete burials associated with a distinctive artifact set, and changes in burial tradition throughout the Bronze Age, provides data that is amenable to analysis. This temporal change is of significant archaeological interest and is archaeologically distinct, as it is book-ended by changes to both the burial and artifactual record. This article presents the analyses of the ceramic vessels associated with the burials, the burials themselves, and other associated artifacts in order to identify changes in the nature of interments as they relate to social organization. The data presented were gathered during the first four of the seven seasons of excavation, using a wide variety of numerical, statistical, spatial, and comparative analyses. The analyses will identify the manner in which individuals were buried and how this relates to other burials within the site, as well as how this information can be used as a relative chronological indicator, as an absolute chronology has only just been undertaken (Higham and Higham 2009).

CERAMIC VESSELS

In this study, the ceramic vessel typology is based on that used by O'Reilly (1999 : 157) for his analysis of the site of Ban Lum Khao, because this allowed for inter-site comparisons. This system is based on discrete vessel characteristics, as proposed by Shepard (1971). O'Reilly's typology allowed for 15 different forms of pots, with numerous sub-forms for minor variations (O'Reilly 1999 : 163-166). Due to the differences between the sites, there were unavoidably a number of forms at Ban Lum Khao that did not occur at Ban Non Wat and vice versa. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Bronze Age Mortuary Vessels of Ban Non Wat
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.