Doctoral Training in Teaching and Preparedness of Early-Career Marketing Educators

By Johnston, Timothy C.; Milkman, Martin I. et al. | Academy of Educational Leadership Journal, September 2013 | Go to article overview

Doctoral Training in Teaching and Preparedness of Early-Career Marketing Educators


Johnston, Timothy C., Milkman, Martin I., McCoy, James P., Academy of Educational Leadership Journal


LITERATURE REVIEW

Research on training doctoral students to teach has bemoaned the lack of formal training in graduate programs. Butler, Laumer & Moore (1994) found that a majority of colleges of business were making some efforts to improve the quality and effectiveness of their teaching assistants, but the marketing discipline in particular fell short of ensuring quality teaching in business schools.

Griffith (1997) examined marketing doctoral programs and concluded that "many universities have not fully integrated, to any substantive degree, educator training into doctoral student academic programs." Madhavaram & Laverie (2010) concluded that "marketing educators have the responsibility to develop competence in teaching," and that "doctoral days are the best time to start work on pedagogical competence (teaching skills)."

These research studies have concluded that doctoral teacher training efforts, specifically for marketing educators, are needed and have fallen short in the past. The need for marketing doctoral teaching training is important for early-career professors who wish to be successful in the profession, as well as professors in doctoral programs whose responsibility it is to train future teachers.

The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB, 2012) standards for accrediting doctoral programs includes "Preparation for teaching responsibilities in higher education (for those students who expect to enter teaching careers)" as one of five learning goals normally included in a doctoral program. AACSB standards also require faculty to emphasize teaching effectiveness in their careers, as pointed out by Madhavaram and Laverie (2010), including making learning and pedagogical contributions to remain Academically Qualified by AASCB standards.

The goal to increase emphasis on teaching in business education is by no means unanimous, and Armstrong and Sperry (1994) concluded that business schools should emphasize research over teaching if they desire prestige.

This paper looks at the current state of teacher training in doctoral programs as reported by recent marketing doctoral graduates who are working in the academy. We begin by discussing the methodology of the survey and describing the sample. We conclude with results of (1) the degree of teaching and teacher training encountered by professors in their doctoral programs, and (2) the professors' perceptions of their teaching preparation and performance.

METHODOLOGY

We conducted a survey to explore how recent marketing doctoral recipients (including ABDs) perceived the pedagogical training they received during their doctoral programs. The sample was compiled from lists of "Who Went Where" survey respondents. The American Marketing Association Doctoral Students Special Interest Group (DocSIG) produced these surveys of successful job-seekers on the marketing academic job market. This paper uses data collected from "Who Went Where" respondents from 2006 through 2010 (DocSIG, n.d.).

The survey sample included only successful job-seekers who responded to the "Who Went Where" survey; hence people who did not respond, as well as job-seekers without a job to report, were not represented. We obtained email addresses online based on the person's name and hiring institution.

The survey was presented online. A link to the survey was sent in an email to 500 potential respondents on April 14, 2011. Attempts were made to correct failed or changed email addresses. On April 25, 2011 we re-sent the request to complete the online survey. As a result of these efforts, we received usable responses from a total of 96 people, a response rate of about 19 percent.

The list of 500 graduates from 60 universities gleaned from the Who Went Where surveys is a significant proportion of the total population of marketing doctoral graduates for the years 2006-2010. For comparison, the U. …

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