Secretly Trading Away Our Independence: President Obama Is Pushing Two Trade Pacts Leading to Economic and Political Integration of the United States with the European Union and Pacific Rim Nations

By Jasper, William F. | The New American, May 20, 2013 | Go to article overview

Secretly Trading Away Our Independence: President Obama Is Pushing Two Trade Pacts Leading to Economic and Political Integration of the United States with the European Union and Pacific Rim Nations


Jasper, William F., The New American


During the 2012 presidential campaign, Republican challenger Mitt Romney attacked President Obama on trade issues, charging that Obama "has not signed one new free-trade agreement in the past four years." "I'll reverse that failure," Romney pledged.

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Romney's charge was at once both true and misleading. President Obama had not signed any "new" trade agreements; however, he did win congressional approval for, and signed, trade agreements with Colombia, Panama, and South Korea that had been negotiated by the Bush administration. Moreover, he has continued the efforts of the Clinton and Bush administrations to create a Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and a Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP).

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The TPP and TTIP should he of special concern to Americans, since, as we shall detail presently, the authors and promoters of these agreements admit that they deal with far more than trade and have been designed to drag the United States into "regional governance" on a host of issues. The architects of the TPP and TTIP are virtually unanimous in their head-over-heels praise of, and support for, the political and economic merger taking place in the European Union (EU). The once-sovereign nations of Europe have been tricked, bribed, and browbeaten into yielding control over almost every aspect of their lives to globalist banking and corporate elites and their bureaucratic servitors in Brussels. The national governments, legislatures, and courts in the European Union are becoming mere administrative units of the unaccountable rulers of the increasingly tyrannical EU central government.

During a visit to London in 2000, former Soviet dictator Mikhail Gorbachev referred to the increasingly authoritarian European Union as "the new European Soviet." He was not being critical, mind you, but merely offering a startlingly candid observation about the EU "project," of which he has been--and remains--an enthusiastic booster. Gorbachev, a thoroughly committed one-worlder, famously argued for expanding the EU into a "common European home" that would include Russia and its former Soviet satellites.

Vladimir Bukovsky, the famous Russian dissident, author, neurophysiologist, and survivor of Soviet prisons, psychiatric prisons, and labor camps, has delivered a credible indictment of the absolutism and repression that are becoming the hallmark of EU governance. In a speech in Brussels in 2006 sponsored by the United Kingdom Independence Party, Bukovsky called the EU a "monster" that must be dismantled before it becomes a full-fledged dictatorship like the Soviet system he had fought. He compared the European Parliament to the Supreme Soviet, the faux legislative body that merely served as a rubber stamp for the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, and compared the EU's socialist central planning to Gosplan, the Russian acronym for the State Committee for Planning, which drew up the Soviet Union's infamous Five-year Plans for the National Economy. Bukovsky charged:

  It is no accident that the European Parliament, for example, reminds
  me of the Supreme Soviet. II looks like the Supreme Soviet because it
  was designed like it. Similarly, when
  you look at the European Commission it looks like the Politburo. I
  mean it does so exactly, except for the fact that the Commission now
  has 25 members and the Politburo usually had 13 or 15 members. Apart
  from that they are exactly the same, unaccountable to anyone, not
  directly elected by anyone at all. When you look into
  all this bizarre activity of the European Union with its 80,000 pages
  of regulations it looks like Gosplan. We used to have an organisation
  which was planning everything in the economy. to the last nut and
  bolt, five years in advance. Exactly the same thing is happening in
  the EU. When you look at the type of EU corruption, it is exactly the
  Soviet type of corruption, going from top to bottom rather than going
  from bottom to top. … 

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