Heat of the Moment

By MacCabe, Colin | New Statesman (1996), May 24, 2013 | Go to article overview

Heat of the Moment


MacCabe, Colin, New Statesman (1996)


The Philosopher, the Priest and the Painter

Stephen Nadler

Princeton University Press, 254pp, [pounds sterling]19.95

In 1616, a young French nobleman named Rene Descartes, deeply dissatisfied with the methods offered to him by his teachers, determined to abandon further academic study. Although he had proved himself a brilliant student, he would now seek truth not in books but in the world and in himself.

His first steps into the world were as a soldier serving in the modern bureaucratic armies of the Thirty Years War. On the night of 10 November 1619, while stationed outside Neuburg an der Donau, Descartes climbed into a large stove to keep himself warm. The experience of that night is perhaps best understood as a mystical experience in which he was granted a vision of certainty. This vision was, paradoxically, a method of doubt. By doubting all the evidence of his senses, the only certainty that remained was the reality of his thinking self. And it was on the basis of this reality that he would elaborate a method with which to investigate all of knowledge.

Descartes continued his search for truth; he took a long trip to Italy, before he made the decision that, his method perfected, he would settle down to work through the entire range of human inquiry, from mathematics to biology. He those not to live in Paris, then the intellectual capital of Europe, as he thought his time would have been devoured by friends and relatives. Instead, he went to the Low Countries, where he could pursue his research uninterrupted by social intrusion.

Steven Nadler's new book examines Descartes's life in the Netherlands by tracing the history of the portrait of Descartes by Frans Hals. The painting has become our received image of the philosopher, decorating the frontispiece of countless editions of his work. The method of Nadler's book is new historicist: attention to a fragment of the historical record - in this case, a painting - reveals a web of connections that freshly illuminate a period and an author. Nadler paints a compelling picture of Descartes's life in the village of Egmond, northern Holland, and makes it clear that Descartes's life was not as isolated as he represented it. He had a small circle of friends who met in the nearby town of Haarlem - educated men alive to the most modem intellectual debates. …

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