Gran and Grandad Look Key to Social Class; Following in Path Is More Than Chance

The Journal (Newcastle, England), July 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

Gran and Grandad Look Key to Social Class; Following in Path Is More Than Chance


Byline: Kerry Wood? 0191 201 6040 ? kerry.wood@ncjmedia.co.uk

ACHILD'S standing in the British class system is down to their grandparents, new research claims.

For years different grandparenting styles and the role they play in a child's life have been debated.

But now academics at Durham University have found grannies and grandads could be responsible for more than a spot of overindulging when it comes to the youngest members of their families.

New research shows the odds of children landing top professional jobs are at least 2.5 times higher if their grandparents were professors or managers.

Working with peers at Oxford University the project saw researchers trawl through more than 17,000 surveys of Britons born in 1946, 1958 and 1970.

It was discovered the link between class of grandparents and grandchildren could be observed in families both going up and down the social ladder.

According to the study, published in American Sociological Review, 80% of men with both parents and grandparents in the professional or managerial class stayed in similar advant aged positions. Only 61% of men whose parents climbed the social ladder managed to follow them into professional or managerial positions.

However the effect of children following in the footsteps of their paternal and maternal grandparents was seen less in women. Figures showed 66% of women born into higher positions stayed there, while 51% born into an upwardly mobile family retained their parents' new status.

Dr Vikki Boliver, from the School of Applied Social Sciences at Durham University, said: "Although a handful of studies have looked at social mobility patterns of three generations, this is the first time that researchers have found that an individual's fortunes may depend on the attributes and experiences of more distant ancestors such as grandparents. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Gran and Grandad Look Key to Social Class; Following in Path Is More Than Chance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.