Gettysburg: Another Day for Yankees to Wallow in Anti-South Hate

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 3, 2013 | Go to article overview

Gettysburg: Another Day for Yankees to Wallow in Anti-South Hate


Byline: Charles Hurt, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Since the beginning of time, the spoils have always gone to the victors. And they get to write history, too.

So on the 150th anniversary of Gettysburg, Southerners are once again reminded how badly it sucks to lose.

To hear it told today, the Confederacy was nothing more than a hotbed of racist slavers and murderers. The gallant Yankees were nothing short of a pristine band of heroes laying down their lives to set men free. The whole ordeal was about nothing other than putting an end to the abomination that was slavery.

Add in the farcical state of education in the U.S. today - especially the lack of teaching of actual history that actually happened - and you have a perfect storm of Pollyannish fantasy that condemns yet another generation to ignorance and gives today's social engineers yet another false parable to advance their goofy and twisted agendas.

The Gettysburg specials on the History Channel are, of course, told exclusively from the Northern perspective. This is neither new nor surprising. To the winners go the spoils.

But the truly barbaric caricature of the Confederate soldiers is appalling. Great focus on the rebel yell cries. Cameras zoom in on jumbled, yellowed teeth for full-screen shots while guttural, animalistic shrieks play at full volume.

One Yankee sympathizer masquerading as a historian explains that people always ask him how things would have been different if they'd had automatic machine guns during the Civil War. Really? They wonder how Gettysburg could have been made even bloodier with even more bloated corpses rotting in the fields?

What kind of savages does this guy hang around with discussing the Civil War? …

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