Clapper Sorry for Misleading Congress over NSA Spying

By Richardson, Valerie | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 3, 2013 | Go to article overview

Clapper Sorry for Misleading Congress over NSA Spying


Richardson, Valerie, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Valerie Richardson, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

NSA leaker Edward Snowden remained stuck in legal limbo Tuesday as he frantically seeks asylum, but his case prompted an unprecedented apology from the nation's top intelligence officer.

National Intelligence Director James R. Clapper apologized for misleading Congress earlier this year when he said that the National Security Agency does not collect data on millions of Americans.

He called his response clearly erroneous in a June 21 letter to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, California Democrat and chairwoman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.

Mr. Snowden, 30, has been charged with espionage for leaking documents revealing the NSA's daily sweeps of phone and Internet records, which U.S. intelligence officials have described as pattern analysis, not content analysis, and aimed at unearthing potential terrorist suspects.

Mr. Clapper was asked by the intelligence committee in March if the NSA gathered data on millions or hundreds of Americans. The intelligence chief said previously in an interview with MSNBC-TV that he tried to give the least untruthful answer possible.

Meanwhile, Mr. Snowden's increasingly desperate bids for asylum to escape prosecution on espionage charges could lead him back to America - specifically, South America.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro defended the accused leaker to Russian reporters Tuesday during a visit to Moscow to meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

He did not kill anyone and did not plant a bomb, said Mr. Maduro, according to the Interfax news agency. What he did was tell a great truth in an effort to prevent wars. He deserves protection under international and humanitarian law.

Mr. Maduro avoided saying whether he would admit the accused leaker, but Bolivian President Evo Morales said in an interview with Russian Today television that his country would be willing to consider granting asylum to Mr. Snowden.

If there were a request, of course we would be willing to debate and consider the idea, Mr. Morales said on RT Actualidad, a Spanish-language broadcast, adding that in the past, Bolivia was there to shield the denounced. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Clapper Sorry for Misleading Congress over NSA Spying
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.