Hitchcock Has Nothing on Charles Saatchi in His Power to Deeply Disturb

By Lezard, Nicholas | New Statesman (1996), June 21, 2013 | Go to article overview

Hitchcock Has Nothing on Charles Saatchi in His Power to Deeply Disturb


Lezard, Nicholas, New Statesman (1996)


Back from New York and I discover that once again summer has failed to materialise. It had all been so tantalising on the way out: the trees on the A312, which links the A40 and the M4, were alive with birdsong, and that's a phrase I never thought I'd be writing in my lifetime. And I arrived in a chilly New York just an hour away from taking a battering from a rainstorm so vicious it was even given a name.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The return journey was the opposite: from a glorious summer New York, not too hot or muggy and with brilliant sunshine, to a cold, grey London. I looked out at the houses on the North Circular and wondered whether they were the most unloved houses in the world. If looking at them makes you feel like killing yourself, what must living in them be like? (For connoisseurs of depressing housing, I recommend the stretch, about three miles long, centred on Neasden.)

Well, the sun has now returned, in a tentative way, like a guest who is not really sure whether he wants to be at the party or not, and is quite conscious that there is a better one down the road but feels an obligation to drop in just for a bit. We have noticed your reluctance, o Ra, and frankly, we are a little disappointed. At least it was pleasant enough for Charles Saatchi to be able to sit outside and half-choke his wife without suffering a chill or getting rained on.

There. I made it right down to the end of the second paragraph before mentioning that incident. For although I have a hunch others in this magazine will be commenting on it and that mine may well be surplus to requirements, I am afraid I am helpless: I have become obsessed with it. The pictures, once seen, cannot be unseen, and the distance between the face of Nigella we all know from the telly and the frightened, weeping face from the paparazzi shots is immense and terrifying. Not even Hitchcock, in art, managed to unsettle so much.

I find myself unable to think of anything else. I have friends who have suffered violence at the hands of the men they love; in one case it was very nearly fatal and the doctors who examined her expressed relief that she had not been beaten for a second longer than she already had, so close had she come to death. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hitchcock Has Nothing on Charles Saatchi in His Power to Deeply Disturb
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.