Justice Defends Fla. 'Peacekeeper' Rallies; Says Its Group Was Following Mandate in Trayvon Case

By Seper, Jerry | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 12, 2013 | Go to article overview

Justice Defends Fla. 'Peacekeeper' Rallies; Says Its Group Was Following Mandate in Trayvon Case


Seper, Jerry, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Jerry Seper, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Justice Department on Thursday dismissed suggestions by a Washington-based watchdog group that it helped organize a pressure campaign last year against George Zimmerman in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

Judicial Watch said earlier this week that Justice Department records obtained by the organization in response to local, state and federal public document requests showed that so-called peacekeepers from the department's little-known Community Services Service had been dispatched to Florida to help organize marches, demonstrations and rallies.

The Community Relations Service is described by the Justice Department as its peacemaker for community conflicts over race, which the protests last spring over Trayvon's death would seem to be. While the department claims its peacemaker agency does not take sides in such disputes, Judicial Watch said the documents and public accounts show otherwise.

But in a statement, the Justice Department said, The Community Relations Service was in Sanford, Florida, fulfilling their mandated mission.

Trayvon was fatally shot in February 2012 as he walked through a gated community. Mr. Zimmerman, a resident of the community and its neighborhood watch captain, is on trial in the death, although he has claimed he acted in self-defense.

These documents detail the extraordinary intervention by the Justice Department in the pressure campaign leading to the prosecution of George Zimmerman, Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton said. My guess is that most Americans would rightly object to taxpayers paying government employees to help organize racially charged demonstrations.

Judicial Watch said the documents reveal that the Community Relations Service was deployed to Sanford, Fla., following the fatal shooting of the teenager to help organize and manage rallies and protests against George Zimmerman.

The documents included information that:

? In March 2012, CRS spent $674 on being deployed to Sanford, Fla., to work marches, demonstrations and rallies related to the shooting and death of an African-American teen by a neighborhood watch captain.

? In March 2012, CRS spent $1,142 "in Sanford, Fla., to work marches, demonstrations and rallies related to the shooting and death of an African-American teen by a neighborhood watch captain.

? In March 2012, CRS spent $892 in Sanford, Fla., to provide support for protest deployment in Florida.

? In March and April 2012, CRS spent $751 in Sanford, Fla., to provide technical assistance to the City of Sanford, event organizers, and law enforcement agencies for the march and rally on March 31.

? In April 2012, CRS spent $1,307 in Sanford, Fla. to provide technical assistance, conciliation, and onsite mediation during demonstrations planned in Sanford. …

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