Suite and Sheherazade from Temirkanov and His Orchestra

By Cowan, Rob | Gramophone, June 2013 | Go to article overview

Suite and Sheherazade from Temirkanov and His Orchestra


Cowan, Rob, Gramophone


Rimsky-Korsakov Sheherazade, Op 35. The Legend of the Invisible City of Kitezh-Paean to the Wilderness; Wedding Procession and Tartar Invasion; Battle of Kershenets St Petersburg Symphony Orchestra/Yuri Temirkanov Signum (F) SIGCD320 (58' * DDD)

Best here is the sequence from The Legend of the Invisible City of Kitezh, which is generally well played, especially the closing 'Battle of Kershenets'. But the principal draw, Sheherazade, is for much of the time a frustrating mixture of wilful exaggeration and mind-dulling routine. For example, the swift coda to 'The Young Prince and Princess' sounds uncomfortably rushed, unlike, say, Kyrill Kondrashin who, while also favouring a fairly quick tempo, shapes the music so beautifully that the effect is entirely natural. And why, come the thrilling climax to 'The Shipwreck', does Yuri Temirkanov ask his timpanist to indulge acrudely accelerating roll (at around 8'56")? To be fair, the 'Festival at Baghdad' itself is often excitingly played but 'The Sea and Sinbad's Ship' has little suggestion of sea spray about it and 'The Kalender Prince' virtually nothing to distinguish it from dozens of other versions that have appeared over the years and that have since vanished from memory.

Temirkanov has made many fine records but were you to chance upon this before the best of the rest you would hardly be inspired to venture further. Other than that, I can report reasonable sound which isn't actually that much of an improvement over the truly exceptional (mostly analogue) Sheherazades that have preceded it, namely (and in addition to Kondrashin) Reiner, Dorati, Beecham and Maazel. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Suite and Sheherazade from Temirkanov and His Orchestra
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.