Dances by Piazzolla et Al Arranged for Violin and Guitar

By Rickards, Guy | Gramophone, June 2013 | Go to article overview

Dances by Piazzolla et Al Arranged for Violin and Guitar


Rickards, Guy, Gramophone


'Histoire du Tango' Falla Siete Canciones populares espanolas--No 1, El pano moruno; No 3, Asturiana; No 4, Jota; No 5, Nana; No 7, Polo Paganini Moses-Fantasie. Sonata concertata, MS2 Piazzolla Histoire du Tango Sarasate Zigeunerweisen, Op 20 Augustin Hadelich vn Pablo Sainz Villegasgtr Avie (F) AV2280 (60' * DDD)

Popular dance is the connecting thread in Augustin Hadelich's latest recital disc (his third) for Avie, coupling Argentinian tango, Flamenco and gypsy dances with three virtuoso works by Paganini. The result is a bit of a mixed bag but Hadelich's refinement and excitement carry one through these very diverse works.

And it is a curious journey, starting in a Buenos Aires bordello c1900 in the first movement of Piazzolla's titular suite (originally written for flute but, like Prokofiev's Second Sonata on a previous disc, played here on violin). Histoire du Tango then moves forward in 30-year jumps via a 1930s cafe and 1960s nightclub to the concluding 'Concert d'aujourd'hui', as pertinent to today as to the intended 1990. Falla's Popular Spanish Songs (only five of the seven are given here) have their roots in Spain's Moorish past, and the combination of laments, lullaby and love songs is as dramatic in Paul Kochanski's much-played transcription as in the vocal original. The use of Pablo Sainz Villegas's vibrant guitar as accompaniment, however, does give the arrangement a further Spanish twist.

Only one work on the disc is as originally scored, however: Paganini's splendid Sonata concertata. The musical weight is all in the opening Allegro spiritoso, which is caught superbly by Hadelich and Villegas as, indeed, is the ensuing Adagio assai espressivo. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Dances by Piazzolla et Al Arranged for Violin and Guitar
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.