Catholic Schools as Schools of Academic Excellence: A Summary of the Third Catholic Higher Education Collaborative Conference Proceedings

By Weitzel-O'Neill, Patricia; Torres, Aubrey Scheopner | Journal of Catholic Education, September 2011 | Go to article overview

Catholic Schools as Schools of Academic Excellence: A Summary of the Third Catholic Higher Education Collaborative Conference Proceedings


Weitzel-O'Neill, Patricia, Torres, Aubrey Scheopner, Journal of Catholic Education


While studies have found evidence that Catholic school students, specifically, secondary students, outperform their public school peers and that the impact is particularly powerful for disadvantaged students or students from low socioeconomic, minority, and single-parent backgrounds (e.g., Bryk, Lee, & Holland, 1993; Coleman, Hoffer, & Kilgore, 1982; Jeynes, 2008), most of these studies have become dated and are fiercely debated (e.g., Alexander & Pallas, 1983; Goldberger & Cain, 1982; Murnane, 1981; Noell, 1982). Recent research has found that neither public nor Catholic schools have a consistent advantage over the other in raising student achievement in math and reading, though the impact of poverty is "considerably mitigated for students in Catholic schools" (Hallinan & Kubitschek, 2010, p. 143). Regardless of the research findings, Catholic schools are called upon to ensure "the instruction which is given in them is at least as academically distinguished as that in the other schools of the area" (canon 806 [section]2). Academic excellence is often a distinguishing characteristic of Catholic schools, one that is central to the mission and identities of these schools. What does it mean to be academically excellent? In an era of high-stakes assessments and increased accountability, many debate whether Catholic schools should adopt similar policies, using evidence-based practice or objective evidence to inform practice. Others advocate that all Catholic schools should adopt thoughtfully prepared standards to ensure high expectations, a socially just environment, and accountability (Kallemeyn, 2009). Still others call for a definition of academic excellence that focuses on critical thinking, questioning inherited concepts and fostering new ideas.

On September 26, 2010, invited Catholic school educators gathered for the third Catholic Higher Education Collaborative (CHEC) conference hosted at Boston College entitled "Catholic Schools as Schools of Academic Excellence: How Can Catholic Higher Education Help?" This 3-day conference, cosponsored by the Roche Center for Catholic Education at Boston College and the Center for Catholic School Leadership at Fordham University, was the third in a series of six CHEC conferences. CHEC began in 2007 at a national gathering of Catholic colleges and universities to explore ways to support and strengthen Catholic education at all levels. The group agreed to convene a series of six conferences focused on salient topics crucial to the sustainability and improvement of Catholic elementary and secondary schools, including the immigrant Church, leadership, academic excellence, Catholic identity, governance, and accessibility and affordability. Researchers and practitioners come together at these conferences in an effort to examine these topics critically, developing greater understanding of the needs of Catholic schools, identifying concrete ways to support Catholic education, and building partnerships between Catholic higher education and Catholic Pre-K-12 schools.

The CHEC conference hosted at Boston College focused on how Catholic higher education can assist--more and better--in developing and supporting essential components necessary to achieving academic excellence in Pre-K-12 Catholic schools. Speakers posed challenging questions, and, similar to the format of the CHEC conference held at Loyola University Chicago on leadership, significant time was devoted to discussion among participants. Eighty-seven invited attendees from 22 states participated in these conversations, including deans, administrators, and researchers from 24 Catholic colleges and universities; superintendents and other diocesan administrators representing 20 dioceses; presidents, principals, and school administrators from six Catholic schools; and directors and administrators from six Catholic education associations and organizations, such as the Greater Milwaukee Catholic Education Consortium, the Mid-Atlantic Catholic Schools Consortium, and the National Catholic Educational Association (NCEA). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Catholic Schools as Schools of Academic Excellence: A Summary of the Third Catholic Higher Education Collaborative Conference Proceedings
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.