Sport Education and Multiple Intelligences: A Path to Student Success

By Martin, Matt; Morris, Mackenzie | Strategies: A Journal for Physical and Sport Educators, July-August 2013 | Go to article overview

Sport Education and Multiple Intelligences: A Path to Student Success


Martin, Matt, Morris, Mackenzie, Strategies: A Journal for Physical and Sport Educators


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

One of the unique challenges associated with teaching is learning how to develop lessons and curricula that meet the needs of all students. In physical education, teachers must consider a number of student characteristics when planning and implementing curricula including ability level, special needs, gender, and past experiences in physical education and sport (Mitchell & Kernodle, 2004). Designing lessons that are developmentally appropriate and engaging is essential to ensure that middle and high school students enjoy their physical education experience and remain physically active into adulthood. Yet past research has shown than many students are not excited about participating in physical education. This feeling of apathy is in part due to physical educators implementing the same curriculum year after year, often lacking the necessary tools to develop interesting and new curricula (Carlson, 1995; Garn & Cothran, 2006).

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Sport Education

As a starting point, physical educators could benefit from considering the types of curricula and pedagogical practices that maximize student enjoyment and involvement in physical education. For example, past research has shown that a sport education curriculum was a preferred approach when compared with traditional methods of teaching physical education. In fact, students of all ability levels reported increased opportunities for involvement, peer support, and improved competence when participating in a sport education-based physical education program (Hastie, 1998; Siedentop, 2002).

There are seven main characteristics of the sport education model. The first characteristic, seasons, is the term used instead of the term unit to build excitement for upcoming sports lessons. Typically, during a sport education season, a series of practices is scheduled, leading up to a formal competition. Seasons are longer than traditional physical education units (8 to 10 weeks vs. 2 to 4 weeks). The main premise behind having longer seasons is that students have more time to become enthusiastic, proficient, and literate sport participants (Siedentop, 1994). A second characteristic, affiliation, is the value placed on being a contributing member of a team for an entire season. The third characteristic, formal competition, is a sport education theme where small-sided games are played using round robin tournaments and league schedules. A culminating event is a fourth characteristic in which students compete to participate in a final event (e.g., Super Bowl, World Cup).

Festivity is another characteristic that relates to the culminating event where activities are structured to make physical education more enjoyable and exciting for the sport participants (e.g., awards ceremony, team names, t-shirts). Keeping formal records is a sixth characteristic, in which game statistics are recorded and posted for the participants to view (e.g., batting average, shots on goal). Records are kept to set personal and team goals and to help students become more literate in sports. Participation in various roles is the final characteristic of the sport education model, where students take turns participating in roles including: coach, player, referee, statistician, scorekeeper, team manager, and publicist (Siedentop, 1994; Siedentop, Hastie, & Van Der Mars, 2011). Participating in these roles helps students understand the rules, strategies, and tactics of sport from different perspectives. For example, as a referee, students gain a greater understanding of how actively refereeing competitions (i.e., calling penalties/fouls) affects the outcomes of games/competitions. More importantly, students who are often marginalized in physical education (female and low-skilled students) have more opportunities to be contributing members of their teams by participating in the various roles (Hastie, 1998; MacPhail, Gorely, Kirk, & Kinchin, 2008). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sport Education and Multiple Intelligences: A Path to Student Success
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.