Willful Blindness, Mortal Peril; Fantasizing That Enemies Are Friends Is a Dangerous Pastime

By Gaffney, Frank J., Jr. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 6, 2013 | Go to article overview

Willful Blindness, Mortal Peril; Fantasizing That Enemies Are Friends Is a Dangerous Pastime


Gaffney, Frank J., Jr., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Frank J. Gaffney Jr., SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Diana West's splendid new book, American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation's Character, is an expose of a practice that she persuasively argues has cost us dearly in the past and endangers our future. Former federal prosecutor-turned-pundit Andrew C. McCarthy calls it willful blindness, and we indulge in it at our extreme peril.

Ms. West painstakingly documents how America's government, media, academia, political and policy elites actively helped obscure the true nature of the Soviet Union. She persuasively argues that such blinding began literally from the moment in November 1933 when Franklin Roosevelt normalized relations with the USSR in exchange for the Kremlin's fraudulent promise to forgo subversion against this country.

Ms. West came to this exhaustive research project by dint of her curiosity about the failure of such elites in our own time to recognize and counter today's present danger: the Islamists and their Shariah doctrine, which some have described as communism with a god. Several examples illustrate willful blindness in our time:

Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, whose trial for the Fort Hood massacre finally begins this week, repeatedly signaled his intention to engage in such an act of jihad prior to gunning down his comrades. Testimony is expected to show that officers in his chain of command refused to entertain such a possibility - and actually threatened the careers of those who had the temerity to warn of the violent mayhem this Islamist believed he must inflict, pursuant to Shariah.

Such dereliction of duty was compounded by a serious error by the nation's first line of defense against such internal threats - the FBI. Thanks to communications intercepts by the lately much-maligned National Security Agency, the FBI was aware that Maj. Hasan was being mentored about his duty under Shariah by an al Qaeda-associated cleric then based in Yemen, Anwar al-Awlaki.

Yet, rather than move in on Maj. Hasan, the FBI dismissed such counseling as nothing more than research for the major's thesis at a U.S. military medical school.

The FBI's performance against such jihadists has been further hampered by the influence operations of Muslim Brotherhood-linked individuals and organizations who are now inside the wire of the U.S. government - in a manner all too reminiscent of the penetration of our governing and other institutions by Soviet agents during the 20th century, chronicled so brilliantly by Ms. West. The training materials of not only the FBI, but the military, the intelligence community and homeland security agencies, have been purged of information that would help connect the dots between the supremacist Islamic doctrine of Shariah and terrorism.

Such self-imposed blinding about the enemy's threat doctrine is dressed up as multicultural sensitivity and political correctness, aimed at not gratuitously giving offense to Muslims. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Willful Blindness, Mortal Peril; Fantasizing That Enemies Are Friends Is a Dangerous Pastime
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.