Without Immigrants, Our Country Wouldn't Function. So Let's Give It a Go

By Hasan, Mehdi | New Statesman (1996), July 19, 2013 | Go to article overview

Without Immigrants, Our Country Wouldn't Function. So Let's Give It a Go


Hasan, Mehdi, New Statesman (1996)


I have a modest proposal for the likes of Ukip, Migration Watch, the Home Secretary, David Goodhart, Paul Dacre and, of course, the BNP. Why not call for "A Day Without Immigrants?" Wouldn't that demonstrate, once and for all, that neither our economy nor our society needs migrants? That they are a burden, rather than a blessing?

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"A Day Without Immigrants" was the name given to a rather innovative series of protests in the US in 2006, which brought more than a million Latinos on to the streets of 50 cities, from New York to Los Angeles. They boycotted shops, schools and their places of work to try to highlight the plight of undocumented migrant workers.

But here's how I'd implement a similar boycott here: anyone in the UK born abroad or with a parent born abroad would stay at home for 24 hours. Any business or organisation founded by an immigrant or the child of an immigrant would close for the day.

Britain would be transformed--but, regrettably for the immigration-bashers, in a wholly negative way. In fact, I suspect it would be a pretty awful 24 hours for most Britons, dark and dystopian, even. Think Danny Boyle's 28 Days Later--but without migrants, rather than with zombies.

Let's start with the trivial stuff. Who would serve you in restaurants or coffee shops? Who would make your sandwiches and wraps at lunchtime? What would be the point of going out to eat in the evening if there were no longer any Chinese, Thai, Malaysian, Indian, Japanese, Turkish, Lebanese, Persian, Italian, Spanish and, yes, French restaurants open?

How about your health? Who'd patch you up and prescribe your medicines? Ministers and their outriders in the right-wing press like to scaremonger about the spiralling costs of so-called health tourism (which amounts to a shocking 0.01 per cent of the [pounds sterling]109bn NHS budget) and exaggerate the numbers of migrant families that turn up expecting free treatment in our overstretched A&E departments. The reality, as the chair of the council of the Royal College of GPs, Dr Clare Gerada, has pointed out, is that "you are much more likely to have an immigrant caring for you than sitting up in front of the emergency department". About 30 per cent of the doctors and 40 per cent of the nurses working in the health service were born abroad. Put simply, the NHS could not survive 2.4 hours without its migrant workforce.

The same applies to the social-care sector. If you have a sick parent living in a care home, you might have to take the day off to look after them. In 2009 a fifth of all care assistants and home carers--135,000 people in total--were foreign-born; in London, 60 per cent of care workers were migrants. Speaking of taking the day off, neither the Deputy Prime Minister nor the leader of the opposition would have to turn up to Westminster for PMQs--Nick Clegg is the son of a Dutch mother and half-Russian father; Ed Miliband is the child of Polish refugees.

Meanwhile, the Chancellor would have to go to the Commons to warn that "A Day Without Immigrants" would, if extended over a year, force him to introduce a further [pounds sterling]7bn of spending cuts and/or tax rises. …

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