How Wales' Landscape and D Traditions Bring out the Special Flavouur of Welsh Lamb B; Welsh Lamb Gained Protected Geographical Indicator (PGI) Status - Which Guarantees Its Quality and Heritage - 10 Years Ago. Sally Williams Follows Two PGI Welsh Lamb Farmers and Their Prized Food's Journey from Field to Fork

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), August 13, 2013 | Go to article overview

How Wales' Landscape and D Traditions Bring out the Special Flavouur of Welsh Lamb B; Welsh Lamb Gained Protected Geographical Indicator (PGI) Status - Which Guarantees Its Quality and Heritage - 10 Years Ago. Sally Williams Follows Two PGI Welsh Lamb Farmers and Their Prized Food's Journey from Field to Fork


SNOWDONIA is a view that tourists pay good money to share; it has a unique landscape and climate.

Daphne Tilley, a 73-year-old grandmother of five and her family, believe that Snowdonia is the key to their sweet and succulent PGI Welsh Lamb.

PGI is a status awarded by the European Union (EU) that protects and promotes named regional food products that have a quality, reputation or noted characteristics specific to that area.

Snowdonia is a place that has nurtured Welsh lambs for generations and Daphne understands the need to work in harmony with nature to ensure her meat - sold at some of the top tables in London and around the world - is the best it can be.

Daphne said: "It does look idyllic on the mountain but if we didn't continue to farm, it would revert back to rough scrub.

"Managing it properly ensures the wildlife that we share the mountain with can thrive and keeps it looking the way it does.

"We need to be in balance with nature."

The landscape is also key for fourth-generation farmer Myrddin Davies, whose lambs graze 1,000 feet above sea level near Conwy.

He said: "We're classified as a hill farm; there's a slope in nearly every field, so the ewes do use more energy walking up.

"But having the hills and mountains means that we in Wales can put fresh lamb on the shelves almost all year round as they reach their ideal weight at different times.

"On low-lying coastal farms, lambs are normally born hey are amb.

around January and ththe traditional spring lam"The higher you go slopes, the longer they reach their weight, swould generally be the lambs, while if they are tops of Snowdonia, thlater again."

up the take to so ours autumn e on the hey are Despite different conditions, one thinsources of PGI Welsh have in common is t animals are reared in trafashion on the lush graWales' rainy climate prfarming ng all h Lamb that the aditional ass that roduces in abundance.

Sheep farming in Wales is documented as far back as the 14th century, and Queen Victoria considered Welsh Lamb the most tender and ate it exclusively in her 19th-century household, according to her royal chef. …

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How Wales' Landscape and D Traditions Bring out the Special Flavouur of Welsh Lamb B; Welsh Lamb Gained Protected Geographical Indicator (PGI) Status - Which Guarantees Its Quality and Heritage - 10 Years Ago. Sally Williams Follows Two PGI Welsh Lamb Farmers and Their Prized Food's Journey from Field to Fork
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