Protecting the Wrong People; the Government Mobilizes to Defeat the President's Enemies, Not the Nation

By Rahn, Richard W. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 13, 2013 | Go to article overview

Protecting the Wrong People; the Government Mobilizes to Defeat the President's Enemies, Not the Nation


Rahn, Richard W., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Richard W. Rahn, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Obama administration has a penchant for not safeguarding agents of the U.S. government that it ought to protect, while at the same time protecting errant civil servants, some of whom belong in jail. Almost everyone is now aware of the U.S. governmentAAEs failure to protect our ambassador and others in Benghazi, Libya, and the refusal to properly characterize mass killing at Fort Hood, Texas, as terrorism, thus denying benefits to many of the victims. There is another case Au that of Robert Seldon Lady Au which is equally outrageous, but has received little publicity.

Bob Lady has worked in undercover capacities for the U.S. government for 24 years. His last assignment was in Italy, where, as a consular official, he worked with the Italian police to protect the Italian and American people from terrorists, probably saving many Italian and American lives. In exchange for his good work, an Italian court convicted him in absentia of allegedly kidnapping a terrorist leader off the streets of Milan and rendering him for questioning. Because of the nature of his work and U.S. secrecy laws that he upheld, he was not able to give a

public defense Au and was forced to flee Italy. An Italian court has issued an Interpol warrant for Mr. Lady, who was carrying out his duties as instructed by officials of the Obama administration. America has a tradition of not leaving wounded soldiers in the field: We do not abandon those who protect us. However, President Obama has yet to insist that our Italian allies pardon Mr. Lady and withdraw the warrant for his arrest.

Contrast these actions with the treatment given to those in the Internal Revenue Service and regulatory agencies who have broken U.S. law. When the IRS scandals first broke, the president assured us that the wrongdoers would be punished. Instead, no one has been fired or penalized, and some of those accused of engaging in illegal activities have been given raises and promotions. The law is clear. The IRS may not share taxpayer information with any other government agency (certain exceptions involving national security are permitted). We now know that the IRS leaked taxpayer information to officials of the Federal Election Commission and other agencies, and even to those involved in the Obama re-election effort so that Mitt RomneyAAEs campaign donors could be harassed.

The IRSAAE stonewalling of Tea Party and other conservative-leaning groups, denying them the ability to obtain donations, was nothing less than an attempt to steal an election. Using the IRS against oneAAEs political enemies is the essence of political corruption, and undermines the democratic process. …

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