Manning Will Serve Time at Leavenworth as Man; Army Doesn't Treat Gender Disorders

By Waterman, Shaun | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 23, 2013 | Go to article overview

Manning Will Serve Time at Leavenworth as Man; Army Doesn't Treat Gender Disorders


Waterman, Shaun, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Shaun Waterman, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Pvt. Bradley E. Manning, the former Army soldier convicted of the biggest leak of classified documents in U.S. history, will serve his 35-year sentence as a man, not as Chelsea, the woman he wishes to be, an Army spokesman told The Washington Times Thursday.

The Army does not provide hormone therapy or sex-reassignment surgery for gender-identity disorder, George Wright said.

A day after being sentenced for leaking 700,000 classified documents to an anti-secrecy website, Manning declared, in a statement to the media, I am female. The words sparked a debate over how much responsibility federal authorities have to accommodate the desire to be treated as a woman.

Mr. Wright said Manning would serve her sentence in the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., where she would have access to mental healthcare professionals, including a psychiatrist, psychologist and social workers.

But the Army will not be paying for Manning to undergo what transgender activists call transition - surgery and hormone treatments designed to bring people's bodies into line with their identity.

Our current policy with regard to 'intersex' surgery is that it is a covered benefit only when performed to correct sex-gender confusion-ambiguous genitalia which is documented to have been present at birth, said Maria L. Tolleson, a spokeswoman for Army Medical Command.

Manning's lawyer, David Coombes said if the military fails to accommodate his client's desire to be a woman, he would do everything in my power to force them to.

The Human Rights Campaign - an advocacy group for gays, lesbians and transgendered people - said there is a clear legal consensus that the U.S. government should cover the cost of sex-change operations for federal prisoners if the treatment is medically necessary.

The military has an obligation to follow those guidelines, Jeff Krehely, the group's vice president, said.

He also said the news media having reported on her wishes, must respect them, noting that the widely followed Associated Press Stylebook instructs writers to use the name and pronouns preferred by the transgender person. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Manning Will Serve Time at Leavenworth as Man; Army Doesn't Treat Gender Disorders
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.