An Investigation of Home Disadvantage in Fed Cup Tennis

By Gayton, William F.; Theriault, Lindsey A. et al. | Journal of Sport Behavior, September 2013 | Go to article overview

An Investigation of Home Disadvantage in Fed Cup Tennis


Gayton, William F., Theriault, Lindsey A., Morneau, Peter G., Journal of Sport Behavior


A home advantage in sport competitions has been well-documented. While the most research has been focused on professional male team sports (Courneya & Carron, 1992), the home advantage has also been documented in individual sports (Gayton & Langevin, 1992), women's sports (Gayton, Mutrie & Hearns, 1987), and high school team sports (Gayton & Coombs, 1995).

Although these studies consistently support a home field advantage, Baumeister and Steinhilber (I 984) reported that under certain conditions the home field may be disadvantageous. Specifically, these authors hypothesized that the imminent opportunity of winning a major championship in front of a supportive audience would lead to a paradoxical decrement in performance. This was expected to be the result of self-presentational concerns that occur when athletes are on the verge of redefining themselves as champions (Schenkler & Leafy, 1982). This concern about the way one is presenting the self leads to an increase in self-attention and consequent impairment in performance. This is a result of the athlete over thinking about what he or she is doing and overriding automatic performance (i.e the ability to "just do it"). An analysis of archival data from championship playoffs in professional baseball and basketball supported their reasoning. In an analysis of Major League Baseball postseason games from 1933 to 1982, these authors confirmed that the home team tended to win the first two home games (60% win percentage), but then to lose the last game in a seven-game series (40% win percentage), whether it was Game 5, 6, or 7. They also reported that the home team made fielding errors more frequently in a decisive Game 7 (.65 per game in Games 1 and 2 vs 1.31 in Game 7). In an analysis of basketball, these same authors examined data from semifinal and championship seven-game playoff series of the National Basketball Association from 1967 to 1982. The home team faired significantly better in earlier games rather than in the final games (.70 win ratio in Games 1 through 4 vs .39 win ratio in Game 7). In their analyses of individual performances, they assessed percentages of free throws between the first four games of a series and the final game of a series (whether Game 5, 6, or 7). The home team shot significantly less accurately in the final game when compared with the visiting team (success ratio .69 compared to .74), yet there was no significant difference among the first four games (.72 vs .73).

Attempts to replicate the results of Baumeister and Steinhilber (1984) have yielded mixed results. Gayton, Matthews and Nicklaus (1987) assessed whether the home disadvantage identified by Baumeister and Steinhilber (1984) could be extended to professional ice hockey by analyzing the semifinal and final Stanley Cup championship series between 1960 and 1985. Contrary to findings for professional baseball and basketball, there was no evidence of a home disadvantage in professional hockey: in Games 1 through 4, the home teams' win ratio was .538, while in the last game of the series (if it was Game 5 or 6), the home teams had a win ratio of .525. Kornspan, Lerner, Ronayne and Etzel (1995) found no evidence of a home field disadvantage in National Football League conference championship games played between 1970 and 1993. In these games, the home team games had a higher win ratio (.71) and so had a home advantage.

On the other hand, Benjafield, Liddell and Benjafield (1989) reaffirmed the presence of a home disadvantage in professional basketball, baseball, and hockey. They reported that the home disadvantage is prevalent for teams who have developed an expectation for winning (e.g., the New York Yankees). Likewise, Wright, Voyer, Wright and Roney (1995) offered additional support for a home disadvantage in professional ice hockey in finding the home team tended to win Games 1 and 3 but to lose the last game. In contrast to the methodology and results of Gayton et al. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

An Investigation of Home Disadvantage in Fed Cup Tennis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.