Changes in Law Will Widen the Scope of Whistleblowing; Following the End of the Trial of Wikileaks Whistleblower Private Bradley Manning, Fflur Jones Says New Legislation in the UK Will Give Greater Protection to Individuals Wanting to Lift the Lid on Malpractice in the Workplace

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), August 29, 2013 | Go to article overview

Changes in Law Will Widen the Scope of Whistleblowing; Following the End of the Trial of Wikileaks Whistleblower Private Bradley Manning, Fflur Jones Says New Legislation in the UK Will Give Greater Protection to Individuals Wanting to Lift the Lid on Malpractice in the Workplace


LAST week Private Bradley Manning was jailed for 35 years for leaking US military documents to Wikileaks. The scale of his activity and the worldwide media attention it received has resulted in Manning being branded the ultimate whistleblower.

But what does whistleblowing mean in a more everyday context, and what protection is there for the people who do it? Whistleblowing refers to the act of a worker informing an employer, legal adviser or other official that they suspect or know dangerous/illegal activity is taking place.

The whistleblower will, in most situations, be protected by the law if they encounter any mistreatment as a result of their whistleblowing.

After Private Bradley Manning passed Afghan war logs, Iraq war logs, and other classified US military cables to Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, he was charged with several criminal offences and detained in a Kuwaiti military camp.

This is an extreme example of a whistleblower being made to suffer for revealing damaging, private information.

A more commonplace example could be the shop worker who tells their manager that another worker has been seen taking money from the till, and the manager responds by giving them a warning about making such serious allegations and docks their wages.

Legislation to protect people from such treatment at work was first introduced in the UK in July 1999, after several high-profile disasters such as the sinking of the Zeebrugge ferry, the Piper Alpha explosion and the BCCI financial scandals.

Investigations into all of these cases found that staff had been aware of the risks but either they were too scared to speak out or they had done so in the wrong way or to the wrong person. The Public Interest Disclosure Act (PIDA) was introduced to help change this pattern, and to try to avoid similar tragedies in future.

Now, changes have been made to PIDA which will widen the scope of whistleblowing laws, and have a particularly significant impact on employers. The main implications of these reforms will be that: | Whistleblowers no longer have to prove that they acted in good faith. This should make it easier for whistleblowers to be protected, but their honesty and motives for whistleblowing can still be questioned in legal proceedings; | Whistleblowers will now only be protected if they believe that they are acting "in the public interest". …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Changes in Law Will Widen the Scope of Whistleblowing; Following the End of the Trial of Wikileaks Whistleblower Private Bradley Manning, Fflur Jones Says New Legislation in the UK Will Give Greater Protection to Individuals Wanting to Lift the Lid on Malpractice in the Workplace
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.