Fort Hood Massacre's Unfinished Business; Providing Benefits for Victims Is a Matter of Honor in Texas

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 4, 2013 | Go to article overview

Fort Hood Massacre's Unfinished Business; Providing Benefits for Victims Is a Matter of Honor in Texas


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Fort Hood shooter is where he belongs, on death row, while his victims remain in limbo. In a fit of political correctness, the Obama administration decided to classify the 2009 massacre on the Texas military base as workplace violence instead of what it was: the assault of an Islamic militant upon our soldiers here at home. The real-life consequence of the designation is that the victims aren't being properly compensated for their loss.

U.S. Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan got what he wanted last week when a military judge sentenced him to death for his assault on fellow soldiers. Shouting the jihadist battle cry, Allahu akbar, he opened fire on unsuspecting troops, killing 13 and wounding 32 others before being stopped by a police officer's bullet. The American-born psychiatrist had drunk deeply from the poisoned well of an Islamist ideology that abhors the presence of any Western influence in the home environs of Islam. Betraying his oath of service, Hasan became a vocal critic of U.S. intervention in the Middle East before unleashing his cowardly ambush on his comrades. Unless a mandatory appeals process derails his goal, the 42-year-old murderer will achieve the jihadist dream of a death in service to Allah.

Members of the American military embrace a different code. They serve under arms to preserve the constitutional liberties that make life in the United States worth living. The government has historically rewarded their service by taking care of those wounded and the families of those killed while fighting the nation's wars. …

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Fort Hood Massacre's Unfinished Business; Providing Benefits for Victims Is a Matter of Honor in Texas
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